Wed Feb 07, 2007 6:04 am

Hey Grumpy...GOOD ADVISE Son :!: :wink: I also like your tag line...sorta reminds me that "Life is NOT a dress rehearsal" :!: :wink:

Wed Feb 07, 2007 5:11 pm

One thing to remember when working with electricity just because you think it can't happen or some one say's it can't do that it doesn't mean that it didn't do the unexplained.In nearly 40 years as a mechanic I have seen some really odd(and what I thought not possable)things happen,and heard of some even wierder things.The new electronics are getting even worse for doing wierd stuff. Mark:

Wed Feb 07, 2007 5:43 pm

It's also important to understand the difference between current(ohms) and voltage(volts) and there relationship as descibed by ohms law. That can be a whole days class in it self. Rick

Wed Feb 07, 2007 5:58 pm

Current = amps - amount of current flow in a circuit
Volts = potential - the force that causes current to flow
Resistance = ohms - the impedance to current flow

Ohm's Law states the relationship of the three elements:
Current flow (in amps) is equal to voltage (in volts) divided by resistance (in ohms).
If you know any two of the elements, you can determine the third.

You're right Rick, we could spend days on this........ but I (and I'm sure many others) would be willing to discuss or answer whatever questions I can if anyone has them.

Wed Feb 07, 2007 7:23 pm

I learned about that years ago and could not even come close to Big Dog's lesson.

One interesting 'effect' of resistance is that if you have a bad connection.... it is effectively resistance, so you will not get the same current where you need it.

The key lesson is that good grounds, correct gauge wires, GOOD CONNECTORS (very hard to find these days) and tight connections make the electricity happy and go where it's supposed to go instead of getting lost along the way!

Wed Feb 07, 2007 9:26 pm

I too, have really enjoyed Grumpy's tag line!

I do, however, seriously question his definition of 'tingle' when speaking of getting bit by a live plug wire :lol: :wink: :roll: :!:

Larry

Wed Feb 07, 2007 9:43 pm

Larry in IN wrote:I too, have really enjoyed Grumpy's tag line!

I do, however, seriously question his definition of 'tingle' when speaking of getting bit by a live plug wire :lol: :wink: :roll: :!:

Larry


Larry,

I'm timid so I don't know the answer to this: If touching the plug wire without touching any other part of the tractor to complete the circuit... will I still get knocked for a loop? :? :? :?

Wed Feb 07, 2007 9:45 pm

yes

Wed Feb 07, 2007 10:14 pm

The tingle (Thats putting it mildly) is really hard to explain but when ya feel it, it reminds you of the days (early 50's) when your dad said "hold this wire while I pull on the starter rope to see if this mower has any spark". 3 feet in the air says it does. Then he explains that electricity has to have a ground so if you hold on the handle it won't shock you. :oops: :oops: :oops: Some of us never learn. Appreciate the comments on the tag line but it's something I believe from the bottom of my heart. Live while you can :!: :!: Grump . I have the feeling George already knew that answer. :wink: P.S

Wed Feb 07, 2007 10:25 pm

P
I / E

Thu Feb 08, 2007 11:34 am

grumpy wrote: it reminds you of the days (early 50's) when your dad said "hold this wire while I pull on the starter rope to see if this mower has any spark".

That is what I thought cats were for. If the cat disappears for the rest of the day, the spark is good.

Thu Feb 08, 2007 12:15 pm

Is it time for a story?

This was while I was still a teenager. A nasty spring storm had done a lot of damage and our phone was out because a big elm tree across from our house fell and broke the line. No doubt the line crews were very busy. Pop decided we should be helpful and repair it ourselves. His intention was for me to pull the two ends together while he twisted the wires. YOW!!! "Stop being a sissy, there isn't even enough voltage to feel... see?" says Pop. I try again. YOW!!! "Ridiculous! See... I can't even feel anything", says Pop. He couldn't get me to try again. Getting the ringer voltage was too much for me and he never touched the wires when it was trying to ring. I doubt he ever understood.

Thu Feb 08, 2007 5:10 pm

George I wonder if some people make better grounds then others do.I get shocks from stuff that no one else does.Phone lines,car batteries and wiring,even off my refrigerator if I lean on it just right with my bare arm.To this day I won't shut off an old Briggs engine or others where you push the metal tab against the plug to short it out.I get a shock every time. Mark:

Thu Feb 08, 2007 5:24 pm

Mark, it is all dependent on how conductive your skin is. And, how well you are grounded yourself - choice of footwear has a lot to do with that.
Some folks are better conductors than others. If you are picking up an electrical shock from your refrigerator you need to have someone check your household wiring. You have a ground fault somewhere.

Thu Feb 08, 2007 5:44 pm

I remember having to put put some open wire up in the mid 70's during a driving rain storm. The line was about 15 miles long from the office to the end. I had on high voltage gloves but they had wet thru long before I started putting the wires back together. Every time I made a connection it felt like a horse had kicked me. All the capacitance of the line was discharging back thru my hands and down thru my hooks to ground. Boy was that fun with 8 or 9 pair to hook up.