Positive ground

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Postby John *.?-!.* cub owner » Thu Feb 08, 2007 10:33 pm

The thickness of callouses on your hands makes a difference.
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Postby George Willer » Thu Feb 08, 2007 11:06 pm

John *.?-!.* cub owner wrote:The thickness of callouses on your hands makes a difference.


That's true, but I think the ringer is 120 volt? You phone guys should know.
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Postby Donny M » Thu Feb 08, 2007 11:15 pm

The ring voltage is between 90 and 150 volts ac. Enough that if applied to the correct place will make you talk :lol: :lol:
8)
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Postby FCUBMAN » Fri Feb 09, 2007 2:16 am

Cecil (53 Cub) wrote:I remember having to put put some open wire up in the mid 70's during a driving rain storm. The line was about 15 miles long from the office to the end. I had on high voltage gloves but they had wet thru long before I started putting the wires back together. Every time I made a connection it felt like a horse had kicked me. All the capacitance of the line was discharging back thru my hands and down thru my hooks to ground. Boy was that fun with 8 or 9 pair to hook up.


It can work the same way with ungrounded wire fencing that parallels a high voltage line. Acts like the secondary of a transformer, and can have a good bite to it! :shock:
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When you get older, lack of pep is often mistaken for patience.

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Postby John *.?-!.* cub owner » Fri Feb 09, 2007 10:09 am

FCUBMAN wrote:
Cecil (53 Cub) wrote:I remember having to put put some open wire up in the mid 70's during a driving rain storm. The line was about 15 miles long from the office to the end. I had on high voltage gloves but they had wet thru long before I started putting the wires back together. Every time I made a connection it felt like a horse had kicked me. All the capacitance of the line was discharging back thru my hands and down thru my hooks to ground. Boy was that fun with 8 or 9 pair to hook up.


It can work the same way with ungrounded wire fencing that parallels a high voltage line. Acts like the secondary of a transformer, and can have a good bite to it! :shock:


We have a farm near here ( Hidden Valley Ranch) that for years could not get electricity due to the remote location, but had a high tension line on towers that crossed it about 300 yards from the house. The power company said it would cost too much to put in a substation just for the one house. The homeowner strung a wire on insulators for about a 1/4 mile along side the towers, and ran it back to the house. He had enough power to run lites in the house, but the brightness changed as the load on the main line varied.
"The Constitution is not an instrument for the government
to restrain the people, it is an instrument for the people to restrain the
government lest it come to dominate our lives and interests." Patrick Henry
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Positive Ground

Postby Russ Leggitt » Fri Feb 09, 2007 11:32 am

Whenever a wire such as a telephone line is strung/run parallel with an
electrical distribution line a generator effect is created. This is referred to
as "induction". A generator uses coils of wire cutting a static magnetic
field to produce electricity. This is accomplished by turning an armature
which consist of many coils of wire within a magnetic field. Now to the
induction aspect. The electricity we use in hour homes and businesses in
the USA is AC [alternating current]. This means that the electrical
potential rises from 0 volts to maximum volts and back to 0 at the rate of
60 cycles per second. Other cycles rates exists for other purposes.
Example, the ringing cycle of most telephone systems are 20 cycle. Most
foreign countries use other cycle rates also. Look at the instructions on
your handheld appliances. As current flows along a conductor an
electromagnetic field is created along and parallel with the conductor.
With AC current this field is expanding and colasping at the rate of 120
times per second. As this field "cuts" across a wire within close proximity
a current flow in the opposite direction is "generated" very much like in a
generator. Here it is the "electro-magnetic" field that is moving and the
wire is static. The amount of voltage "induced" is dependent upon the
strength of the field and the proximity of the parallel wire.

I have seen voltages as high as 160 volts induced into telephone wires
stung on the same pole lines with the AC electric wires. Also, flat, non-
twisted wires such as the service drops have a greater potential for
induction.
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Postby FCUBMAN » Fri Feb 09, 2007 1:28 pm

John *.?-!.* cub owner wrote:
FCUBMAN wrote:
Cecil (53 Cub) wrote:I remember having to put put some open wire up in the mid 70's during a driving rain storm. The line was about 15 miles long from the office to the end. I had on high voltage gloves but they had wet thru long before I started putting the wires back together. Every time I made a connection it felt like a horse had kicked me. All the capacitance of the line was discharging back thru my hands and down thru my hooks to ground. Boy was that fun with 8 or 9 pair to hook up.


It can work the same way with ungrounded wire fencing that parallels a high voltage line. Acts like the secondary of a transformer, and can have a good bite to it! :shock:


We have a farm near here ( Hidden Valley Ranch) that for years could not get electricity due to the remote location, but had a high tension line on towers that crossed it about 300 yards from the house. The power company said it would cost too much to put in a substation just for the one house. The homeowner strung a wire on insulators for about a 1/4 mile along side the towers, and ran it back to the house. He had enough power to run lites in the house, but the brightness changed as the load on the main line varied.


Cool 8) - Free electricity! Power that otherwise would be wasted.
"Remember, I'm pulling for you - we're all in this together!"
Quoted from Red Green of Possum Lodge

When you get older, lack of pep is often mistaken for patience.

(1956 and 1948 Cubs)
User avatar
FCUBMAN
5+ Years
5+ Years
 
Posts: 441
Joined: Thu Dec 28, 2006 12:35 am
Location: CT, Northern
Zip Code: 00000
Tractors Owned: 2 Cubs
1 Simplicity
1 Craftsman
1 Farmall 130 with loader
1 Tiger

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