garden question

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garden question

Postby Daniel H. » Mon Apr 19, 2004 9:08 pm

I'm still learning about gardening. Makes me wish I had payed attention while my dad was still able to show me a thing or two. Anyways, I have a fertilize side dresser and a fast hitch one row planter. (this is on a "100", not a Cub, but I hope y'all don't mind) I want to put in the fertilizer up front and then plant my corn or beans with the planter. Should I put the fertilize in line with the planter runner (in other words in the center of the row) or to the side of the row. I have a single foot mounted in the center now that I can move side to side with a narrow cultivator point on it and the fertilize hose on the back side) The problem is I'm not sure if or what I need to cover and mix the fertilize before the planter. I have some disk hillers, but I'm not sure if I need to bed up the dirt when using a planter. Does anyone have any experience with a similar set up? Thanks!
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Postby Jim Becker » Mon Apr 19, 2004 9:49 pm

We always planted on the flat. But NC is raised bed country. So you may get some different local advise. The front tooth with the fertilizer feed behind it will work fine. Local sources (extension service for one) may be more specific. Absent of that, I would set the tooth at least an inch to one side of the seed row. A little more wouldn't hurt. I would also try to put the fertilizer below the level of the seed. How much below may be a local option as well.
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Postby Harold R » Tue Apr 20, 2004 12:45 am

Does anybody have a picture of a one row seeder. I spent a couple of hours yesterday on both tractors disking, then rowing up raised seed beds. Have to admit, turned out real nice...for a novice. After spending a couple of hours bent over poking holes and droping seeds, to get not even half way through, I believe I'd be interested in one. I think Dan England has a good portion of one. Just didn't think I had a need for one.
My back says otherwise.
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Postby Dan England » Tue Apr 20, 2004 6:38 am

Harold: I don't know how much is missing from my unit. If you are interested, I will sort through my pile of cub items and get the planter parts together for you. I believe that I can get them into the trunk of my car and bring them to you the next time I come to Monroe. Consider these items as a down payment on the belly mower. Let me know if you want them. Dan
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Postby Harold R » Tue Apr 20, 2004 6:56 am

Sure Dan,
I'd feel better though if the deck was already in usable condition. I did find the belt and a pto pulley that goes with it.
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Postby John *.?-!.* cub owner » Tue Apr 20, 2004 8:16 am

HR, they aren't as much fun as having a planter on a cub, but the push type seeders available at Walmart, as well as most farm or garden stores for about $30 or so dollars work good.
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Postby Harold R » Tue Apr 20, 2004 9:24 am

Didn't think of that John...as I said, novice!! :wink: :wink:
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Postby Indiana Robinson » Wed Apr 21, 2004 1:32 pm

Here in Central Indiana and I believe most of the corn belt we always shot for the starter fertilizer two inches to the side and two inches below the seed. I have not applied starter fertilizer in years.
Many years ago all fertilizer was put in the row and sometimes in fairly heavy doses. Seedling damage was common. Placing it to the side and below made a big difference but still heavy doses burned plants when the roots reached it. While I only use broadcast and incorporated fertilizer some guys here use what they call "pop-up". It is just fertilizer placed directly with the seed like in the old days but in very light applications to not burn the seed. In that case the bulk of the fertilizer is broadcast and incorporated or plowed down. Use of a starter fertilizer is often more important on rented ground where the soil fertility levels may be low and where you may not be farming it long term and therefore do not want to spend a lot of money bringing general levels up. By having the bulk of the plants food near the row a higher % of the same amount is consumed than if it were all spread out. Corn roots go a long ways for water but can do well with nearby plant foods. One of the several reasons I don't use starter is that I feel that if the plant can get all it wants to feed on close by that the early rooting is shallow and short. Then when the weather turns dry it takes a while for it to put down deeper roots. If it spends its early weeks extending roots for food then when it turns dry then the roots are already down there. Probably more than anyone wanted to know. YMMV :-)
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Re: garden question

Postby Super A » Thu Apr 22, 2004 12:51 pm

Daniel H. wrote:I'm still learning about gardening. Makes me wish I had payed attention while my dad was still able to show me a thing or two. Anyways, I have a fertilize side dresser and a fast hitch one row planter. (this is on a "100", not a Cub, but I hope y'all don't mind) I want to put in the fertilizer up front and then plant my corn or beans with the planter. Should I put the fertilize in line with the planter runner (in other words in the center of the row) or to the side of the row. I have a single foot mounted in the center now that I can move side to side with a narrow cultivator point on it and the fertilize hose on the back side) The problem is I'm not sure if or what I need to cover and mix the fertilize before the planter. I have some disk hillers, but I'm not sure if I need to bed up the dirt when using a planter. Does anyone have any experience with a similar set up? Thanks!


Daniel,

The easiest thing to do probably is drop the fertilizer in the center of the row and use the hillers to throw up a bed. That should put your fertilizer deep enough not to burn anything. Depends on how much cultivating you are going to do,etc. Is the "foot" one of those deep applicators that the fertilizer hose hooks into? If so, and if you wanted your rows flat you could slide it over 2-3 inches and do it that way.

In our garden, we usually don't use the fertilizer attachment, just turn the hillers to throw out and make a furrow. Then spead fertilizer in the furrow, turn th hillers back around, and go back and ridge up the row.

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Postby Daniel H. » Thu Apr 22, 2004 2:45 pm

Thanks for all the information, guys. The "foot" is a regular cultivator spring trip. I haven't found a deep applicator yet, but I think that's wht I need.
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Postby Rudi » Thu Apr 22, 2004 3:41 pm

Daniel:

This is how we do it here in this part of New Brunswick. After the field has either been disked real good or tilled, we start at the edge of the field and drive straight up the field. We then turn around and drive straight down the field with one wheel in the track we had just made. After we have done the whole field, we walk up the field and spread fertilizer in the tracks. Then we take the horse hoe (read hillers) and build up the row.

When it comes to seeding, we run up the row either by hand or with a tool on the tool bar that will make a trench about 2 inches deep or so. Then we seed and bring the hill back up again.

For potatoes, we plant the potatoes right over the fertilizer, then hill it up. Doesn't hurt the tubers at all, gives em enough of the nitrogen compounds they need and we always get a bumper crop.

You will get lots of variations on how it is done. Read em and decide which one you like. I would talk to the old timers in your area and see how they do it, taking into consideration local soil conditions. Best to heed the old timers - they usually know what they is talking about. I learned it the hard way - don't ask ok :? :oops: :roll: :lol:
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