After a Cub? . . . just thinking

Tue May 25, 2004 10:01 pm

I purchased my first “tractor project”, a 51 Cub, two years ago and am finally at the “paint and put the parts back together” stage. Now infected with the obsession (I've learned) that is shared by many others on this web site, I’m already considering a next project. While I’m definitely committed to restore another Farmall of similar vintage, I’ve been sort of intrigued looking at C’s, H’s, M’s. . . and I’d particularly like to incorporate a front end loader to eventually use.

I’d really like to hear the experiences of others who have proceeded from a Cub restoration to a larger Farmall. What is it like? How does it compare? The scale of the Cub is really convenient sizewise - I can imagine there are a lot of differences, and difficulties, moving bigger. And I can’t imagine I could have gotten this first project done without you folks on this web site. Is there anything like this site for other Farmall models?

Would appreciate any experiences and comments. I'm not ready to start anytime soon, but then again you never know . . .

the next project

Tue May 25, 2004 10:34 pm

When I finished with restoring my "58 Cub, I wanted something a little larger, but not too large. So, I bought (at an Auction) a Farmall Super A and went the route again. Too my pleasure , I selected the right follow up. They make a nice pair. The Cub cuts grass and the SA plows snow and the garden .

Wed May 26, 2004 9:00 am

Larger tractors ususally means bigger, bulkier parts to handle. The restoration process is the same. If you are equipped to handle the larger tractors then the satisfaction will be as great. You could do as you mentioned and work your way up with slightly larger tractors each time. From the cub to an A or B, then to a C and then an H and finally an M.
One thing to keep in mind is that some of the larger tractors are actually cheaper to buy and restore since they are plentiful. They are also usually too small or do not have enough features such as live power which makes them undesireable for today's farming operations and they are too big for the hobby mechanic to use in his half-acre garden. So I guess the best thing to do is to find one you like and have at it!

Wed May 26, 2004 9:32 am

I have a 1945 B Farmall I am currently "re-newing" and I have found alot of "common ground" between it and a cub. In my opinion, the B is a little easier to work on. Take a look at the left side (carb side) of a cub and compare it to the same side on the B (the A is the same, too). All the components on the cub are "tightly packed" together and on the A and the B they are spread out more. Bigger is heavier but, bigger may be easier to work on. Just my $1.00 worth. :wink:

Wed May 26, 2004 9:55 am

My current project is an M. I'm not very far into it yet, but have several observations.

1. The bigger tractors were retired from farming before they were completely worn out. There are plenty of them that don't really need any mechanical work. This M is very sound, but ugly as sin! I bought this one poorly running, but it didn't take long to find and straighten the bent push rod. Voila! Runs perfectly.

2. When they get ugly... there's a LOT of ugly! It isn't really adding character like the ugly on Scruffy does. A closer look reveals no dents or rusted out sheet metal. When the surface rust and peeling paint go away it will be a nice tractor.

3. The Saginaw 3 pt hitch and Schwartz wide front, along with the live hydraulics will make this a great bush hogging tractor.

4. The 5 speed transmission and lots of power will make it even more useful. The road speed will make it possible to use it at my other farm too.

5. It's too big for Bigdog's trailer.

Wed May 26, 2004 10:45 am

Cub-Bud wrote:I have a 1945 B Farmall I am currently "re-newing" and I have found alot of "common ground" between it and a cub. In my opinion, the B is a little easier to work on. Take a look at the left side (carb side) of a cub and compare it to the same side on the B (the A is the same, too). All the components on the cub are "tightly packed" together and on the A and the B they are spread out more. Bigger is heavier but, bigger may be easier to work on. Just my $1.00 worth. :wink:


I agree....I had much, MUCH rather work on a Super A than a @!(*#$@(*#$ Cub. There is just enough difference between the Cub and the bigger tractors to make things more tedious. To me the Cub engine is much more finicky than the bigger tractors.

Also with regards to price you can buy a nice H, M, or even C for about the same money as a really nice Cub.

Al

Wed May 26, 2004 9:13 pm

Thanks for the replies! They all provided me better insight. I have to admit I like Bigdog's idea of one of each in succession the best . . .

Wed May 26, 2004 10:43 pm

Paul, one question that didn't get answered was about a forum for the other Farmalls, the answer,,, right here in the "other tractors" forum! :D There is a LOT of Farmall experience right here to draw from.

We also collect Farmall tractors, have a gander! 8)

The Chown's Tractor Collection

Thu May 27, 2004 6:48 am

The most active Farmall forums I know of are the Red Power forum and the Farmall forum on YTMAG.com. There is also a Farmall forum on ATIS.net though it is not as active as the others.
I'd really like to see the "Other Tractors" forum on this site take off. The cub cadet forum is starting to pick up activity.

Fri May 28, 2004 6:58 pm

I vote for an F 20 there aren't to many of them restored around here yet Paul, I live about a half an hour away in Hunterdon county. Welderrx