Thu Nov 04, 2004 6:51 am

LOts of luck on your tests Rudi.
Bill

Update on Dielectic grease...

Thu Nov 04, 2004 7:01 am

Gents and Gentesses,

I did make it home in time to check my left over dielectic grease, and on the package it stated, "reduces moisture content, also prevents arcing". This was used on the sparkplug, both the top of the sparkplug and on the insulator. It was also to be applied to the inside of the sparkplug boot. Not real sure why the application diagram included the metal part of the sparkplug above the insulator, but the application on the insulator makes all the sense in the world to me. Now then, from what I vaguely remember from my old AC/DC theory classes: "Air is a perfect insulator. The resistance (Ohmage) is infinity". This goes hand in hand with what Donny said previously. Now then, since I don't really like RC colas, nor moon pies, I could be talked into wolfing down a big, old fluffy fresh ham biscuit for the bet. :D :) 8)

Rick

Thu Nov 04, 2004 11:02 am

LUCK :!: :!: :!: :!:

Yo Donny!

Thu Nov 04, 2004 11:31 am

Is this the same AERO Lube you are talking about?

Quote from their website:

AERO LUBE INC is a well established exclusive manufacturer of DYNACHEM LUBE.This non-flammable
formula is non-staining, non-corrosive, non-conductive and water displacing.

Bigdog

Thu Nov 04, 2004 12:06 pm

The dielectic grease I was referring to was from a local Autozone. Whatever they had was in a green packet. I'd have to look at the packet again for a brand name. I did a search on the autozone website, and came up with nothing. Doesn't surprize me though. I know what I bought was something they had under the counter. Nothing special, just something they had on hand for sparkplug applications.

Rick

Thu Nov 04, 2004 12:15 pm

Rick, as I stated earlier, dielectric grease has long been in use in automotive light sockets, connectors etc. Especially in the areas of motorcyble connectors as they are exposed to extreme conditions where moisture causes rapid corrosion.

Thu Nov 04, 2004 12:42 pm

Guys. This is what I used:


Image


Come to think of it :idea: ......... I used it on the rotor tip, and all the contacts on the cap to minimize arc burn and corrosion :!: Figured with the magneto, the spark is real strong and this would help. HMMMMMMM, wonder why I haven't had any problems :?

Thu Nov 04, 2004 1:07 pm

My Dodge 1500 pick up was doing strange things, The speedometer would bounc up to 70 miles an hour while dead stopped and other stuff like that. The dealer said there is water in a connector. He opened dried and repacked wit dielectric grease and no trouble for over a year.
Bill

Thu Nov 04, 2004 2:01 pm

Bigdog wrote:
Is this the same AERO Lube you are talking about?


Nope :!: What I'm talking about is a lithium based grease that is not a "dielectric" grease.

Bigdog wrote:
Rick, as I stated earlier, dielectric grease has long been in use in automotive light sockets, connectors etc. Especially in the areas of motorcyble connectors as they are exposed to extreme conditions where moisture causes rapid corrosion.


While this is all true, I stated earlier that "I" wouldn't use it on switch contacts :!: :!: :!: Nor would I recommend it.

Ron L wrote:
HMMMMMMM, wonder why I haven't had any problems


The dielectric grease on the rotor is just fine :!: :!: A rotor is not a contacting devise. A rotor provides a small air (dielectric) gap for the voltage to jump. With a rotor the current moves through the dielectric grease, just as radio waves move through the air. You don't feel any effects of radio waves do you. No, not unless you are close enough to the antenna where the voltage/current density is high.
As I stated previously air is a great dielectric but you wouldn't want air between your switch contacts, unless you have a very high voltage. An air gap is good for about 60KV per inch.
With connectors they acutally scratch the surface they're mating to, thus removing the dielectric. With this Cub switch or any automotive connector we are talking about relatively small currents and the dielectric grease will work fine. My point is why would you want to decrease the efficiency of the contacts however small :?:

Thu Nov 04, 2004 3:26 pm

Donny, I respect your opinion and have enjoyed this discussion immensely. I have one more observation and will let this die. My opinion is that the dielectric grease will not adversely affect the operation of the switch any more than air would. What would affect the operation is if the switch contacts did not engage securely enough to make a good physical contact. If there is sufficient contact pressure to make a good physical connection, it will sweep enough of the dielectric away to make a good electrical connection. Any reduction of current flow would be in the range of milliamps which would be insignificant considering the magnitude of the current flow necessary to operate the lights. Now, that being said, may I suggest to all that you consider the application of possum fat to the switch contacts? Not only will it increase output -but if the switch does fail and start to heat up, the smell of the possum fat heating up will make you hungry and you'll quit working and head to the house for some of Maw's deep fried road-kill possum strips and no damage will be done to the tractor. :wink: :D :wink: :D :wink: :D :wink: :D :{_}:

And once again....

Thu Nov 04, 2004 3:30 pm

We come right back around to the great big, fluffy fresh ham biscuit. :D :) 8) :{_}: :||): Just right, just right. What's for supper Grandpa?

Rick

Thu Nov 04, 2004 4:03 pm

Bigdog wrote:
My opinion is that the dielectric grease will not adversely affect the operation of the switch any more than air would.


Are you saying that air between the contacts is a good thing :?: Of course not :!: Any dielectric between the contacts is detrimental to the operation of the switch.

and:
Any reduction of current flow would be in the range of milliamps which would be insignificant considering the magnitude of the current flow necessary to operate the lights.


I agree :!: :!: But you won't see a dielectric grease on my tractors until after the non-moving contacts are made. It's a lot like using soap to check for leaks, it works but it's not the product to use.

I too have enjoyed this immensely :!: :!: And I too :!: respect your opinion.
I especially enjoyed Bud's comment about air in the switch :lol: :lol: :lol: that was classic :!:

Now what about soap bubbles :?: :lol: :?: :lol: 8)

Thu Nov 04, 2004 4:22 pm

Donny M wrote:Now what about soap bubbles :?: :lol: :?: :lol: 8)


Only in the bathtub! :oops: :oops: :oops:

Thu Nov 04, 2004 4:26 pm

Bigdog,
If you're refering to a "Cowboy" bubble bath :!: :lol: :lol:
That's nothing to be :oops: :oops: about :!: :lol: :!: 8)

Thu Nov 04, 2004 4:42 pm

Thanks for all the info... Got it :!: Talk about "pandora's box" ........ I Love it :roll: Before I know it, I'll be in the "501" club :shock: Thought it would take me about 41 yrs & 9 mos :? (1 post a month 8)) .............