Mon Dec 27, 2004 10:41 pm

My trailer is 8'6" outside 6'11" inside. The only law is you must have running lights. Like a dually truck 8)

Mon Dec 27, 2004 10:48 pm

8) 8) 8) 8) 8)

Tue Dec 28, 2004 6:28 am

Have learned one truth about trailers, no matter what your hauling. The second or third time you use whatever size trailer you buy it will be two feet too short. Buy the biggest trailer your truck can safely handle and you can afford, you will be happier in the long run.

Tue Dec 28, 2004 10:25 am

You've got that right. I was so proud of my 16 foot bed after using the 12 foot one for years, then about the 3rd load I wished it was about a foot and a half longer.

Tue Dec 28, 2004 10:26 am

All trailers are not created equal, and this is one area that you get what you pay for......usually. The less expensive the price, the cheaper (in quality) the trailer. Some of the so called 'angle iron' trailers use some pretty light weight or thin material, with cross members spaced fairly wide. Decking ranges from something barely holding the knots together to top quality wood. Normally a single axle trailer will have an axle with a rating of not more than 3500 lbs, and most dual axle trailers start with 2, 3500 lb axles. The axle weight rating is what determines the pay load of the trailer, but the weight of the trailer is also part of the payload. In other words with 2, 3500 lb axles, 7000lbs is the gross rating of the trailer, but if the trailer weighs 2000lbs, it can only safely carry 5000 lbs in theory. Thats where the material the trailer is built from comes into play. The trailer may be rated to carry X lbs, but if the structure is very light weight, those X lbs may have to be spread over the entire bed of the trailer for it to carry it, not just in four spots like it would be when hauling a tractor.

I would say to buy the best built trailer you can afford ( and if that is a bottom line cheapey, don't buy one until you can afford a better one), and be sure the vehicle you will tow with is rated to tow the weight you will be towing. All modern vehicles have a max tow rating assigned by the builder, that is determined by the engine size, gearing, and physical capacity the vehicle can safely handle, and just because a vehicle will pull a load, does not mean it will handle that load. A loaded trailer can make a tow vehicle do some scary things in a panic situation, more thrills than a thrill ride (things get real sporty as a pilot would say), and you need to have enough vehicle to control that trailer in that situation.......if it happens.

Speaking of vehicles....

Tue Dec 28, 2004 11:14 am

Would you think a 1995 GMC Sonoma (first cousin to a Chevy S10) with a 4.3 Vortec V6 oil cooled engine and automatic trans would be ok for a Cub transport? Just wondering about the future of hauling my Cub.

:?

Rick

Tue Dec 28, 2004 11:56 am

A GMC dealer should be able to answer that, based on how the vehicle is equipped and what the factory tow ratings are, but I am guessing that it would be.

Tue Dec 28, 2004 1:41 pm

Paul B, You are totally correct. One of the reasons for picking the trailer I did was my tow vehicle (02 Ranger) which is rated to tow 5k and the fact that my biggest anticipated load is 2 cubs with small attachments, Trailer weighs 1500 and 2 cubs weigh 3k to 3500, so that is right at my load limit. I picked the trailer due to it's being lighter.

Sunday sailor, I would think it would tow it, but definitely would want trailer brakes. Check your owners manual or a dealer. Towing capacity depends on engine, transmission, differential gearing, type of truck (extended cab) suspension ,etc. Remember that Any load you are hauling in truck needs to be subtracted form trailer max. Also I would reccommend a frame hitch (class 3). Most step bumpers are only rated at 2k trailer and 200 tongue weight.

Thanks John...

Tue Dec 28, 2004 2:06 pm

I've been thinking about getting a trailer hitch other than the step bumper. I did use the step bumper with a ball for towing my sailboat. But, that boat only weighed 275 pounds full up. I think the trailer may have weighed all of 250 pounds. Never did have any problems with that setup. But, the Cub is much heavier, and "a horse of a different color" weight wise as opposed to a sailboat. BTW, thanks so much on the tip about the air breather tube. Had something clogged up in mine, and once it was cleared, the tractor started running much better. 8) :) :D

Rick

Tue Dec 28, 2004 4:52 pm

Another thought on trailers, a loaded trailer should set level when attached to the tow vehicle - not tongue high, tail low. In a hard stop that can lift the rear wheels of the tow vehicle off the ground. You also do not want the tongue and the rear of the vehicle low. I tow an 18' flat Corn Pro Light Utitily trailer with either 6 Cub Cadet or 4 Cub Cadets and a Cub Lo-Boy. The trailer is rated for 7000, has brakes on both axles, and with load and trailer weight it is about 6500 lbs. I use a heavy 3/4 ton truck and a 10000 lb Reese Equalizing hitch. When the spring bars of the hitch are adjusted correctly everything is level, and you don't know the trailer is back there.

Becareful with the small single axle, tilt bed trailers. You might be able to load it without using ramps, because the bed tilts. But to do that the axle is normally dead center of the bed length (not overall trailer length), and will be a bear to tow at speed above 50-55 mph. The axle should be aft of the bed center for the trailer to track properly, otherwise it will start whipping side to side at that speed. About 10% of the load weight should be tongue weight, up to the vehicle max tongue weight rating, you don't want the trailer to carry all the weight. Never load a trailer tail heavy, that can also cause it to whip and loss of control.

Re: Speaking of vehicles....

Tue Dec 28, 2004 9:42 pm

SundaySailor wrote:Would you think a 1995 GMC Sonoma (first cousin to a Chevy S10) with a 4.3 Vortec V6 oil cooled engine and automatic trans would be ok for a Cub transport? Just wondering about the future of hauling my Cub.

:?

Rick


Your bumper will be stamped with the maximum towing and tounge weight it can handle. This is for the hitch ONLY. The truck may have max trailer weight and combined weight on a label in the driver's door jam. If not, it will be in the owner's manual. It may require that you verify specific equipment on the truck, which should be on another label, probably in your glove compartment.

Bottom line, this stuff can all be looked up, no need to guess.

Tue Dec 28, 2004 10:43 pm

Buggyscott wrote:Have learned one truth about trailers, no matter what your hauling. The second or third time you use whatever size trailer you buy it will be two feet too short. Buy the biggest trailer your truck can safely handle and you can afford, you will be happier in the long run.


I have concluded that trailers are like tractor sheds: It's best to have more than one, of various shapes/sizes. There are times my current tractor hauler is too big, at other times I wish I had a 24 footer with an 8' wide dump bed!

Al

Fri Dec 31, 2004 6:59 pm

I bought a 22' tandem with brakes on both axles with a 5000lb. rating. After all you can't just have 1 cub.
Image



I pull it with the 1/2 ton Silverodo just fine . but I will be upgrading to a 3/4 ton in the near future. Steve

Fri Dec 31, 2004 7:06 pm

Nice looking den for your cubs too!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Bill