Fri Jan 21, 2005 8:17 am

I think the upside down "L" indicating a white demo is an error. I think, and please keep in mind this is conjecture, that the L stands for "Louisville" which was the factory where the part was cast. I have a Farmall 230 and it has several major castings with "L" on them and it was built well after the white demos. I have seen it on other tractors as well. I doubt they would take time to cast a L on demos and leave it off non-demos.

If I understand, you already know you have white paint underneath the red and the correct serial number. Sounds like you have all the proof you need. Congratulations! :D I hope I can own a white Cub or Super A one day.

Al

Fri Jan 21, 2005 9:50 am

I agree with what Al said. Castings all had a variety of symbols cast into them. Typically you will find a part number. Most bigger castings also have the date code. Beyond that there are other codes that may be present and meant something to somebody at the time. They may indicate the supplier for parts that were purchased, identify a specific form that was used or who knows what else. The "L" and the enigmatic "SAMPLE" codes are in this category. These were probably all documented at one time. Explanations of some are probably buried in the archives. At this point, I don't see much meaning in any code showing on any particular casting.

Fri Jan 21, 2005 5:09 pm

I would suggest you take lots of pictures, before, during, and after restoration. Anytime you expose old white paint, take pictures of it. Might mean a lot to you once you're done, and it will document that it's a >>TRUE<< white demo! :P

Al

Sun Jan 23, 2005 6:05 pm

Can't quite agree with some of the postings, as I own a white cub. Other than color, (painted red (originally white) when the dealer sold it to my dad). Casting numbers should have the letter "L" straight up and down on the right side of the torque tube. If not, possibly the tube has been replaced. But that still doesn't mean it's not an original white cub. History on them is hard to find. :?: :?:

Sun Jan 23, 2005 6:40 pm

tglass wrote:Can't quite agree with some of the postings, as I own a white cub. Other than color, (painted red (originally white) when the dealer sold it to my dad). Casting numbers should have the letter "L" straight up and down on the right side of the torque tube. If not, possibly the tube has been replaced. But that still doesn't mean it's not an original white cub. History on them is hard to find. :?: :?:


I don't know what you don't agree with, but I also have a demonstrator. I'd be very surprised if you find any Cub torque tube without an 'L' on it somewhere, regardless of orientation... so the L is meaningless. I do agree with Al that the L indicates Louisville where ALL American Cubs were built. The important marking is the casting number final character which should be either one of S or T.

Here's what mine looked like after the first pressure washing.

Image

Sun Jan 23, 2005 7:11 pm

Casper...is that you :?:

Sun Jan 23, 2005 7:41 pm

Cub-Bud wrote:Casper...is that you :?:


Yup!

Image

Sun Jan 23, 2005 9:36 pm

man i want one!

Mon Jan 24, 2005 8:14 am

cubguy47 wrote:George-

Your demonstrator appears to be equipped with battery ignition. Was this available as an option as early as 1950? I'm not sure, but I thought I read somewhere that it was made standard by 1955. My demo has a magneto.


I think bat. ignition became a factory option in 1949. Not sure what year it became standard equipment. A magneto was optional at least till 1957.

Al

Mon Jan 24, 2005 9:29 pm

Battery ignition wasn't available for the Cub until mid-1950, after the demo's were built. As with any other early Cub, many would have been retrofitted. Battery ignition was an option in the sense that any electrical equipment was an option. Once it was available, virtually all tractors would have been ordered with an option code that included battery ignitoin along with the rest of the electrical equipment. I think basic electrical equipment became standard in about '54 or '55.

Tue Jan 25, 2005 10:39 pm

I have seen this discussed several times, so PLEASE excuse my ignorance here guys, but please explain what a "demonstrator" is. My guess is that it MAY have been something that the factory offered to the dealers just for demostrating only.

Am I totally wrong here? Could anyone tell me what, (if any) if there any difference between a regular Cub and a "demonstrator" or even as to my 55 Cub LoBoy.

If so what should a person look out for and are they worth any more or less money? (I Told you, it was a DUMB question)

Thanks,

John Niekamp

PS: I have seen other pictures of George's white Cub and I thought it was painted white, just for something different from all the rest, now I see I assumed wrong.

Tue Jan 25, 2005 10:50 pm

As I understand, demonstrators were identical to other Cubs except for the paint color...they were painted white. Dealers used them for demonstrating (go figure!), then later painted most of them red and sold them (as new or used tractors?). Seems that most demonstrators are found when the owner is stripping off the red paint and finds white paint underneath...they didn't even know it was a demonstrator when they bought it (kind of like winning an Easter egg hunt, I guess).

I would think that, as identifiable special purpose machines, the demonstrators would be worth more than the others. I know that they look cool at shows.

You're excused if I am.

Edit: I still haven't figured out why they had to be painted white just to demonstrate. Wouldn't a purple Cub demonstrate just as well? LOL!

Tue Jan 25, 2005 11:12 pm

Cubnut wrote:I would think that, as identifiable special purpose machines, the demonstrators would be worth more than the others. I know that they look cool at shows.

You're excused if I am.

Edit: I still haven't figured out why they had to be painted white just to demonstrate. Wouldn't a purple Cub demonstrate just as well? LOL!


Well, one would think, lol

Actually, I was just on George's web site and was looking over ALL his other neat projects over the years, (WOW! some real tasks, GOOD JOB GEORGE, I really enjoyed them very much) The way from the looks of it one really wouldn't know until they start stripping. I really liked the white, it really stands out from the rest. NOT saying the red ones don't look just as nice.

I would guess it would be like going to a "Model T Ford" show, they all look real sharp and are all about the same and then you see one that is painted a totally different color, that one stands out and really catches your eye. Like George's Cub.

John

Where is the torque tube ?

Wed Jan 26, 2005 11:05 pm

where is this so called torque tube casting located.? I've looked in the parts book and can't find any such part designated as such ?

Wed Jan 26, 2005 11:49 pm

351686R3. Book calls it the clutch housing. I usually refer to it as a bell housing.