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farmall cub feaver in Maine

Thu Nov 29, 2012 6:55 pm

I was up in Maine the last week droping off my finished super C and came across a 48 cub with a trip bucket loader. I beleive it is a henderson. It has a pump that has its own resivoir on it, and it runs off the pto. maybe not the best idea when clutch is disengaged no pto. any way I could not find any info on the pump. Has any one seen this set up before? Funny I had cub feaver, but I didnt feel sick!

Re: farmall cub feaver in Maine

Thu Nov 29, 2012 7:01 pm

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this is the pump that should mount by pto

Re: farmall cub feaver in Maine

Thu Nov 29, 2012 7:05 pm

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here is the 48 with the loader I brought home

Re: farmall cub feaver in Maine

Thu Nov 29, 2012 7:51 pm

Yup, sure looks like a Henderson.

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Pics courtesy of TM Tractor

The Henderson normally does not have a PTO pump as it connects to the Cub Touch Control. I imagine that a PO made the modification to the PTO pump. The Henderson does come with an auxillary reservoir though. Nice looking loader and Cub :D

Re: farmall cub feaver in Maine

Thu Nov 29, 2012 8:40 pm

i recognize that pump , looks just like the jeep plow pump that was on my 1963 cj-5 plow jeep when i was a kid. i think it even said jeep or willies on the side. :big afro:

Re: farmall cub feaver in Maine

Thu Nov 29, 2012 10:10 pm

Thats the same thought I had when I saw the picture of the pump. I had that on our Jeepster Comando.

Re: farmall cub feaver in Maine

Thu Nov 29, 2012 11:44 pm

64/67lo-boy wrote:........ It has a pump that has its own resivoir on it, and it runs off the pto. maybe not the best idea when clutch is disengaged no pto. ..............

I would call that an understatement. But several hundred thousand Farmall H's and M's were made without live hydraulics. It beats doing it with a shovel.

Fun is loading gravel or cow exhaust with a trip bucket loader, no live hydraulics, no power steering, and one way cylinders. :{_}: :{_}: :{_}:

Using a trip bucket loader in 12 easy steps;
#1 While driving into pile steering with left hand, push rod with right hand to lower bucket
#2 Push in clutch, take out of gear, release clutch (may or may not need brakes)
#3 Pull lift rod with right hand to raise bucket
#4 Push in clutch, put in reverse, release clutch
#5 Watch where your backing, then push in clutch, put in forward, release clutch
#6 Head for truck, trailer, or spreader watching that bucket is high enough to clear side of same
#6A Bucket can be raised higher as tractor is going forward towards trailer if needed
#6A1 If bucket won't clear by the time you arrive at side of trailer repeat steps #2 and #3 then return to step #6
#7 Push in clutch with load centered over trailer (may or may not need brakes)
#8 Pull trip lever
#9 Shift into reverse, release clutch, watch where you're backing
#10 Push in lift rod to lower bucket to ground after clearing trailer until bucket latches
#11 Pull lift rod to raise bucket
#11A If steps #10 an 11 can't be accomplished because of room repeat step #2
#11B Lower bucket until it latches
#11C Raise bucket to a suitable height and proceed to step #12
#12 Push in clutch, shift to forward and repeat from step #1 a couple dozen times

It definitely beats a shovel, of course if you do this for any length of time it will feel like you've been beaten with a shovel. Remember while doing all this you still have to work the throttle. Sometimes you just literally don't have enough hands to work everything. Done by someone with a little practice and it almost has a ballet quality. Usually though it's more of a slow motion plane crash.

Re: farmall cub feaver in Maine

Fri Nov 30, 2012 7:52 am

Good post, Scrivet! How well I remember that drill! You forgot to mention the complications added, when you also have to steer the tractor with the same hands that you're doing everything else with.

Re: farmall cub feaver in Maine

Fri Nov 30, 2012 8:18 am

There are a lot of Cubs in Maine!

Must have some kind of pulley/sheave on the pto with a bracket for the pump? I have seen that done with a pump for a sprayer rig, never for a loader. Several advantages to running it on the TC, one is the pressure is regulated.

Re: farmall cub feaver in Maine

Fri Nov 30, 2012 8:31 am

May I add to Scrivetts post. Park spreader far enough from barn so loader can be raised from low enough to clear barn to high enough to clear spreader without stopping. Vern

Re: farmall cub feaver in Maine

Fri Nov 30, 2012 10:42 pm

"There are a lot of Cubs in Maine! " Heck, Larry, don't let Barnyard get wind of this. He'll wipe us out.

Re: farmall cub feaver in Maine

Fri Nov 30, 2012 11:56 pm

Not to worry Jeff..... they are too pricey in Maine. Except for the one I got a few years back :lol: My favorite Cub!

Re: farmall cub feaver in Maine

Sat Dec 01, 2012 12:10 am

Gary Dotson wrote:Good post, Scrivet! How well I remember that drill! You forgot to mention the complications added, when you also have to steer the tractor with the same hands that you're doing everything else with.

Very True!
Also another complication I left out between steps 1 and 2 is our Farmall H would always raise the front wheels off the ground about a foot when really digging good and kicking the clutch in would let the front end slam back down onto the ground. You had to hit the clutch before stalling the tractor and time the brakes so they engaged at the same moment the clutch released to keep the front end hanging. Then ease off on the brakes to slowly lower the front end back onto the ground.
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