Materials for Making Fuel Lines

Fri Jan 18, 2013 3:18 pm

Just wanted to ask where you guys get the steel? tubing, the connectors, and the tools and kits to make the fuel lines for the Cubs. I have several Cubs and SuperA/140 tractors that either have stripped connectors or spliced lines with rubber and inline filters that I'd like to take off and install a nice, new factory style fuel line. Since I have several to do, I would like to buy all materials in bulk and a decent set of tools and a kit to do so. I figured alot of you guys would know, since some of yall make these at Cub Fests. THANKS!

Re: Materials for Making Fuel Lines

Fri Jan 18, 2013 3:26 pm

It's been a while since I replaced mine but if I remember correctly, a 5/16" brake line from your local auto parts dealer has the correct fittings that will screw right into the bowl and carb. Others will be along soon and correct me if I am wrong.

Later,

Rick :big afro:

Re: Materials for Making Fuel Lines

Fri Jan 18, 2013 3:28 pm

5/16 brake lines, from an auto parts store, is what I use. Benders are available, lots of places. Harbor Freight s where I got mine.
Fittings, 1/2 inch, fine thread, should be available at auto parts stores, along with the ferrules. TM has ends and ferrules, too. Ed

Re: Materials for Making Fuel Lines

Fri Jan 18, 2013 3:32 pm

The brake line needs to be 20" long. You can re-use the fitting from the brake line after you cut the flare off the line. If you are doing a bunch you may be better off getting a roll of tubing and a handfull of ferrules and fittings.

Re: Materials for Making Fuel Lines

Fri Jan 18, 2013 3:34 pm

You can get a nice tubing bender at Sears, Home Depot, Lowes, etc.

I use the brake line stick material that NAPA sells individually. I believe the last one I made up cost about $5.00 for everything, tube, fittings, etc. Also, the line comes with two fittings on it, you just need to purchase a set of ferruls, because the nut fittins work for flared ends (like is already on the tube when you buy it, or ferrul fittings (like is used in the Cub's fuel system. I also bought a set of tubing wrenches, because it is easy to strip off the shoulders on those brass fittings with a standard wrench, but they're not really necessary.

One trick I learned, make up the fuel line with the carburetor just finger tight on the manifold. Once you've got all the tubing bent, and you think you're finished, tighten up the carb, then finger tighten the nuts/ferruls, just to get them to "stick" on the new fuel line. Don't tighten them up at this point. Disassemble, and have a fitting there that you can use to tighten up the fuel line into and crimp the ferrul a bit into the fuel line. Then, re-assemble again with the carb just finger tight, so you don't cross the threads in the carb. One of mine was being stubborn, so I actually had the carb really loose on the manifold, tightened up the fuel line to the carb, then tightened up the carb on the manifold. It's much easier this way, and the hard part is not stripping out the threads in the carb, that's why I leave the carb loose on the manifold.

Here is a pic of the last one I made up in the summer:
Image

Re: Materials for Making Fuel Lines

Fri Jan 18, 2013 3:36 pm

5/16" brake line from NAPA, ferrules and compression fittings from NAPA, a tubing cutter, and a tubing bender http://www.harborfreight.com/tubing-bender-3755.html -- you're in business. I have a bender that I got off the Snap-On truck, however, I'll readily admit it is overkill. I remove the flared ends of the tubing and cut the tubing into 19" lengths (for Cubs), you will have a bit left over when you make a line. Better to have a bit left over than to need more. I have a supply of line, ferrules, compression fittings and I'm go to go.

Re: Materials for Making Fuel Lines

Fri Jan 18, 2013 3:38 pm

Barnyard wrote: If you are doing a bunch you may be better off getting a roll of tubing and a handfull of ferrules and fittings.


Yeah, that is exactly what I want to do! You never know what you'll need to make a fuel line for! Haha, there needs to be a "Sam's Club" for Auto Parts!
Last edited by AL Farmall Boy on Fri Jan 18, 2013 3:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Materials for Making Fuel Lines

Fri Jan 18, 2013 3:38 pm

Image

That's Preeeeetty, gitractorman. :wink:

Re: Materials for Making Fuel Lines

Fri Jan 18, 2013 3:58 pm

I make lots of these, I COP-PRO brake line in the 25ft roll, it does not rust and is a combination of copper/nickel, it is easy to bend, the only tool you need is a tubing cutter has the nuts use ferrels to crimp them, it runs about $50 a roll, you can buy it on line or from a parts store
Tim

Re: Materials for Making Fuel Lines

Fri Jan 18, 2013 4:48 pm

For some reason, I thought I would need a flaring tool....but I guess that would be for brake lines themselves (right?) Looks like all I need are ferrules and the nuts. How does the ferrule attach to the line and stay in place?

Some good info thus far.Thanks guys!!

Re: Materials for Making Fuel Lines

Fri Jan 18, 2013 4:56 pm

Once you tighten down the fitting ithe ferrule will crush into the line and stay in place. Like gitractorman said though, put the line all the way in the carb and tighten it just enough for the ferrule to slightly crush and stay in place then remove it and place a fitting on it to tighten all the way. Trying to tighten the ferrule down while in the carb could strip the carb threads.

Re: Materials for Making Fuel Lines

Fri Jan 18, 2013 6:03 pm

Barnyard wrote:Once you tighten down the fitting ithe ferrule will crush into the line and stay in place. Like gitractorman said though, put the line all the way in the carb and tighten it just enough for the ferrule to slightly crush and stay in place then remove it and place a fitting on it to tighten all the way. Trying to tighten the ferrule down while in the carb could strip the carb threads.


I'm not understanding this quite clearly......

Ok. I insert the fuel line all the way into the carburetor. I then slide a ferrule on the line. Now what I'm not understanding is how you tighten it enough to crush the ferrule into place. The next step says to remove the line after "attaching" the ferrule and insert a fitting to tighten all the way. How would I have tightened it before to "attach" or "Crush" the ferrule. Would I not use a fitting? Sorry I'm not seeing this simple concept clearly.

Re: Materials for Making Fuel Lines

Fri Jan 18, 2013 6:19 pm

put the fitting on the line, then the ferrule. Then insert the line all the way into the carb and tighten the fitting to crush the ferrule onto the line just enough to hold it in place. Then remove the line and put a female fitting on the male fitting to finish tightening the ferrule to the line. Once the ferrule is tight on the line you can remove the female fitting and install the line. This does two things, it protects the threads in the carb from damage and it ensures the ferrule is in the proper place. If the ferrule is too close to the end or too far from the end you will have leaks or the line won't tighten all the way.

You can skip this part, and some people do, but if you decide to tighten it all the way in the carb to crush the ferrule you risk stripping the carb threads.
I hope I explained that right.

Re: Materials for Making Fuel Lines

Fri Jan 18, 2013 6:24 pm

I like to use this fitting
http://www.tmtractor.com/new/fl/512fp.htm
you can also get it at any Case/IH dealer , also pic up a fitting from any good parts store to seat the ferrule before you screw it into the carb if it is an IH carb they have week threads anyway, if it is a Zenith , it will already have a fitting so you can just seat it in there.
Seat the ferrule before hand if going on an IH carb regardless of where you get the fittings.
Boss

Re: Materials for Making Fuel Lines

Fri Jan 18, 2013 7:40 pm

I have noticed that all 5/16" brake lines are not really the same outside diameter. Some of the black "anodized" finished tubing seems to be larger than the "silver" finished tubing -- so much so that ferrules are too tight and almost impossible to slide onto the tube without a lot of polishing the tube ends. Maybe I just got a bad batch from the PRC.

Bill