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Re: Cold weather battery

Sun Feb 10, 2013 11:20 am

I have one that is grounded to the deluxe seat frame. It mostly works, but is a very hokey way to do it. It was like that when I found it, luckily it's 12V.

Seems all the common 6v batteries are too tall to use the battery box, but on my Lo Boy (12V) it's all nicely hidden in the box. Fortuitous in the ice blizzard we just had...

One day I will get some 'noox' for the battery connections, it is conductive where dielctric grease is not. I really dislike connection and ground problems and can say I have never had a problem with the ground strap to the battery box base. Don't own this Cub anymore, but gives you an idea..... I bet Bob Perry will tell you it's still perfect, but he didn't like the lunch/tool box combo and removed it :shock: .

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Re: Cold weather battery

Sun Feb 10, 2013 4:09 pm

Larry, a 19L should fit just fine with the cover on.

Re: Cold weather battery

Sun Feb 10, 2013 4:21 pm

Larry we used noox on the battery connections for Tel Co batteries and the 3 and 4 twelve inch buss bars connecting them. I an talking 1200 to 8000 amps at 48 volts. It is good stuff but plain old wheel bearing grease will do if noox is not in your tool kit. Some times it was more than 8000 amps.

Re: Cold weather battery

Sun Feb 10, 2013 4:57 pm

Vaseline around the battery posts seem to cut down corrosion for me. For the tractor, I've not had to do it because when things get cold I need to charge the battery for several hours before cranking away, and I have a quick disconnect on the neg (-) on the battery to expedite matters, so, during the winter it often is cablea on/off and there's no chance for corrosion to show up.

The NAPA quick disconnect compounds matters because it needs more height than a Cub battery cover allows. Still pondering a wood cover, but hope that a new battery might be lower and all will fit.

I'm thinking about a more elementary ground such as going to the tranny. Nice idea.

I'd bought a battery for the boat that comes out of PA. Nice. Gel, no water. Like it lots. If that outfit makes NAPA batteries, then I like NAPA even more than usual. Hooked up to a 12v trickle recharge solar panel, it is topped up all winter long. Wish there was something like that for the Cub's 6v battery.

For the record, during Nemo the Storm, I had about 5-10 minutes pulling the starter wire while adjusting the choke until it kicked in -- Patience is key and, at 74, I'm working on that lots. That was the night of the storm ( probably 18*F) when I plowed out maybe 8". The next day at 12 to 14*F...forget it for 3 separate times of trying...including charging the battery before going out, and 2 magnetic heaters on the oil pan. On the 4th (charmed) time, it kicked in and away we went. Today...at nearly 30*F, it was as if it was summertime and a quick start up was right there.

Re: Cold weather battery

Sun Feb 10, 2013 7:10 pm

I am using the stock 6 volt system on my Cub and it cranks over as well as anyone could ask for.

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One thing to keep in mind is, while everyone here is correct regarding the proper connections and grounding needed to get the best performance for their starter, the actual ground for the starter is it's connection to the engine block. If your battery is in good condition, your cables are in good condition and your connections are clean and tight and it still cranks over slowly, you may want to loosen and retighten your starter mounting bolts to possibly improve it's grounding to the engine block. Of course the condition of your starter is key too.

If loosening and tightening the bolts makes a difference, you may want to remove the starter and sand the two mating surfaces and reinstall the starter. The contact block on the starter (the switch that is actuated by the pull rod on the starter) can also get really pitted and may decrease conductivity which may lead to slower cranking.
Last edited by ricky racer on Mon Feb 11, 2013 3:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Cold weather battery

Sun Feb 10, 2013 8:47 pm

Image to what Ricky said. I also cover me bases by using a battery maintainer to keep the battery charged right up. In the winters up here it only makes sense :idea: :D

Re: Cold weather battery

Sun Feb 10, 2013 10:02 pm

Yep Ricky, it's ALL grounded through the frame. I learned that lesson when the generator wouldn't charge, painted the whole thing = no ground to the frame. Same with the base of the VR, etc, etc.

My experience is mostly with 12 V Cubs. Every one of them will start on the first or second try, regardless of the temps (although it is pretty moderate here in the winter). If you need to crank the Cub more than a couple times, SOMETHING is wrong. Grounds, points, timing are worth looking at.

Yesterday this one took two tries.... but it was because the linkage to the carb was frozen in place. Once I got it free, started right up. I was amazed!
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Re: Cold weather battery

Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:24 am

Rudi wrote:Who Makes Interestate Batteries and I kinda got a surprise - Johnson Controls.

Kept reading and I discovered who makes the battery in our new Honda :shock:

Might have to check out my local Interstate dealer. :idea:


I have 5 of the big Interstate 12 volts currently in service, the oldest being 6 years old, however I've milked about 8 years out of them on the average. I've had very good performance from them year round and intend on replacing them as need be with Interstates.

Prior to switching to Interstate, I was a fan of the Delco 1200 series but my source dried up.

Re: Cold weather battery

Mon Feb 11, 2013 3:35 pm

lazyuniondriver wrote:
Rudi wrote:Who Makes Interestate Batteries and I kinda got a surprise - Johnson Controls.

Kept reading and I discovered who makes the battery in our new Honda :shock:

Might have to check out my local Interstate dealer. :idea:


I have 5 of the big Interstate 12 volts currently in service, the oldest being 6 years old, however I've milked about 8 years out of them on the average. I've had very good performance from them year round and intend on replacing them as need be with Interstates.

Prior to switching to Interstate, I was a fan of the Delco 1200 series but my source dried up.


Like Rudi suggested, using a battery maintainer will greatly increase battery life for batteries that don't get a lot of use. I have battery maintainers on most everything in the barn, however, I don't have one on my Cub. It gets used enough that it doesn't need it. :big smile:

Re: Cold weather battery

Mon Feb 11, 2013 5:10 pm

A question. Do you guys remove the cables from you 6v batteries when you hook up a battery charger to the battery? I always remove mine because I suspect the Pos.-to-ground would mess up the charger; and the same with the Neg.-to-Cub.

Re: Cold weather battery

Mon Feb 11, 2013 5:30 pm

I normally don't disco anything unless it is for cleaning or safety. I think positive ground systems sometimes confuse folks so the best advice for hooking up a charger or tender is don't even worry or think about where the cables go. Look no farther than the top of the battery itself. Hook red to positive or plus on the battery and black to negative or minus on the battery and everything will work out fine.

Re: Cold weather battery

Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:47 pm

DickB wrote:A question. Do you guys remove the cables from you 6v batteries when you hook up a battery charger to the battery? I always remove mine because I suspect the Pos.-to-ground would mess up the charger; and the same with the Neg.-to-Cub.
So long as you connect + to +, and - to -, you will not have a problem.

Re: Cold weather battery

Tue Feb 12, 2013 6:51 am

Good news on hooking up a bat. charger. It means the cables stay on and I don't need those quick-disconnect devices, and that means a regular bat. cover will work. So, I think I'll start looking for one. Thanks John, Lazy Union Driver.

Re: Cold weather battery

Tue Feb 12, 2013 7:17 am

If you are not worried about being pulled over by the Correct PO PO, I have found that a scrap of laminate flooring at 8" wide will make an undetectable front panel. Cut it to size, flip it over and paint the backside with a can. It finishes just like metal and can't be detected unless you knock on it.

Re: Cold weather battery

Tue Feb 12, 2013 8:34 am

lazyuniondriver wrote:If you are not worried about being pulled over by the Correct PO PO, I have found that a scrap of laminate flooring at 8" wide will make an undetectable front panel. Cut it to size, flip it over and paint the backside with a can. It finishes just like metal and can't be detected unless you knock on it.

I guess I'm not worried about the correct police. The front, back and cleats are oak and the sides are birch. The oak is RED oak. It is never outside in the rain so I didn't bother with a top. A can of paint and 200 feet and whats the difference? One advantage would be if you wanted a larger battery it could be made longer but I didn't bother. Vern
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