cub repair

Tue Sep 24, 2013 7:32 am

Good morning everybody, I'm getting ready to split my 1951 cub for a new input shaft! This is going to be my first split! Anyone have any tips or tricks to share? :thanx:

Re: cub repair

Tue Sep 24, 2013 7:51 am

put wedges in front axle.

splitting stand make it safer and easier

Re: cub repair

Tue Sep 24, 2013 8:00 am

1. Take a lot of pictures to remember what part goes back where, and in what order.

2. Be careful and be patient. Be safe.

3. Have a dedicated tupperware tub with a lid for bolts and other small parts that can get lost on the floor.

4. Replace any worn bolts, washers, nuts, seals, and other parts during the service. Don't be cheap.

5. Have available all of the necessary manuals and read them.

6. Have a helper if available.

Todd

Re: cub repair

Tue Sep 24, 2013 8:08 am

To expand a little on Todd's #4, replace all lock washers whether they look worn or not.

Re: cub repair

Tue Sep 24, 2013 8:14 am

How To Safely Disassemble A Culti-Vision Tractor is a good visual on how to prepare your tractor. The shown model is an SA but same procedures apply to your Cub. Make the wedges. A splitting stand is really useful and is worth taking the time to make one as it will not be a one time use. Trust us on this .. you may not use it again on this Cub for a dozen years or so .. but remember .. these things are addictive and they tend to multiply unexpectedly. :lol:

Here are some ideas on splitting stands:

  1. How To Make Kodiak's Cub Splitting Stands
  2. How To Make Tractor Splitting Stands from Scaffold Jacks
  3. How To Make 3 Types of Splitting Stands from Scaffold Jacks
  4. How To Make Rick Dulas's Tractor Jack Stands
  5. How To Make Ricky Racer's Tractor Jack Stands
  6. How To Make Todd W's Tractor Splitting Stand
  7. How To Make Dave Winfield's Easy Tractor Stand
  8. How To Make Frederick's Plywood Splitting Stands


These are good suggestions and need to be repeated. You need to apply them :idea: :!: :D

TJG wrote:1. Take a lot of pictures to remember what part goes back where, and in what order.
2. Be careful and be patient. Be safe.
3. Have a dedicated tupperware tub with a lid for bolts and other small parts that can get lost on the floor.
4. Replace any worn bolts, washers, nuts, seals, and other parts during the service. Don't be cheap.
5. Have available all of the necessary manuals and read them.
6. Have a helper if available.

Todd

Re: cub repair

Tue Sep 24, 2013 9:16 am

Be sure to install the bearing retainer frontwards. You may find it backwards when you take it apart. If backwards it will let the shaft move forward, which keeps the PTO from fully engaging.

Re: cub repair

Tue Sep 24, 2013 11:46 am

Actually, I would describe the retainer as being installed "backwards". The emboss should be located into the hole of tranny, facing to the rear. The keeps the bearing held against the back to prevent it from moving forward. If that makes sense.

Re: cub repair

Tue Sep 24, 2013 5:17 pm

thanks for the tips guys I'm going to need all the help I can get! After watching it run I've already found another problem, there is a steady drip of oil coming from the front of the engine where that pulley is where you would crank it! :help: