How do you know which cub is right for you?

Wed Feb 12, 2014 10:18 am

How do you know?
I had one that I was going to go look at and buy (more than likely) and not it looks like it is sold. I had to wait on some extra dollars. I kinda stinks cause I had my heart set on it and then with our winter weather I could not go look at it and then ended up losing it.
So I have been looking for another one.

So how do you know that the tractor you are looking at whether it is pretty and runs great or rusty and runs great is right for you?
How do you make the decision?

Just a Rookie trying to figure somethings out.
I need to meet more people in my area in person and just talk and find stuff out

Re: How do you know which cub is right for you?

Wed Feb 12, 2014 10:53 am

Is this going to be a working tractor or one that only goes to tractor show??. I would not buy one Just because it looks pretty,

There is a what to look for when buying a Cub some where on the forum.

You need to drive it cut some gras, push snow, plow with it if the owner will let you.

Do you have a shop to work in?

look for leaks listen for noise. etc etc

Re: How do you know which cub is right for you?

Wed Feb 12, 2014 11:06 am

Brutalfly wrote:......I had one that I was going to go look at and buy (more than likely) ........ cause I had my heart set on it .........
My recomendation is to get out of that mentality quick! It will cause you to overlook a lot of issues and problems. You have to be objective not emotional (unless it's a family piece).

If you click on the right side "manual" tab above and scroll down just a bit you'll see "Cub FAQ's #1 & #2" That's what Mike is referring to I believe. Good basic info in both.

Re: How do you know which cub is right for you?

Wed Feb 12, 2014 11:22 am

Thanks for the replies.
I understand what you are saying Scrivet.
I try to look at all the cubs and make sure they won't need a lot of work done to them and have implements that I need. That is why the one I was looking at was going to be good. That is the only reason I had my heart set on it (Not trying to be emotional...LOL!) The biggest reasons I wanted it is because it had implements, stored inside, it had a lot of parts fixed on it, good tires, and it seemed like that whenever something was wrong with it the guy fixed it right away.

I don't want something that is going to have problems.
How many of you here collect?
How many of you here buy them for the work?

As long as it gets my jobs done that is what I want.

Re: How do you know which cub is right for you?

Wed Feb 12, 2014 12:10 pm

It's a basic fact that your going to have to work on cubs in some shape or form, they are 35-67 year old tractors. I've had $500 cubs that were good ones that I plowed and planted gardens with that did well for me. It's all in what your going to do with one. Alot of these tractors were just seasonally used anyway for planting or crop growing. Most issues come from sitting instead of running. You will find alot of charging/wiring and fuel issues those are the things I always hated.

I would suggest a later model keystart cub. They are not that much more expensive and with twice the Horsepower, half the wear (sometimes), they will serve you well if you don't like working on stuff. I like the alternators and 12 volt systems, and good wiring and headlights. Just my personal opionion, doubt I'll ever have another round hooded cub to work. I do have an early 47 that I will finish restoring someday just for show.

If you watch Ebay most 48-53 cubs with cultivators for example sell in the $1200-$1500 range. If you look careful you can find a square hooded keystart cub for $1500-$2000. A 20 year newer cub with improvements for little more investment.
Last edited by Brandon Webb on Wed Feb 12, 2014 12:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: How do you know which cub is right for you?

Wed Feb 12, 2014 12:14 pm

https://sites.google.com/site/midmoshowmecubfest/

Attend the MidMo Cub Fest. There will be a number of knowledgeable Cub owners attending. There will be cub tractors to look at and most likely some mechanical work being accomplished. You do not need a tractor to attend.

I don't want something that is going to have problems.
Everything I own is subject to problems. Attending a Cubfest is a great way to learn how to take care of Cub related problems. Also, if prior to the Cubfest, you pose a question or have a problem, most likely the attendees will bring equipment to show how to or help repair the problem.

How many of you here buy them for the work?
All mine are strictly for work except my Grandfather's Allis Chalmers.

Back to wanting to buy a Cub. Cub is a decent tractors. But they do have some draw backs, the biggest being the problem of changing implements from one task to another.

Re: How do you know which cub is right for you?

Wed Feb 12, 2014 1:44 pm

How far you have to drive to get the one you want should figure into the price. I paid a bit much for my 53, but it was less than 10 miles from home, had a brand new 42 Woods, and a complete set of 144 cultivators. I went through it front to back replacing gaskets and seals, no hard parts.

I bought it to use in my garden and has proven to be a real back saver and fun to use. I bought another so I wouldn't have to change implements, and I could use a third one. They don't cost much, parts are plentiful, they're easy to work on, and fun to use.

Re: How do you know which cub is right for you?

Wed Feb 12, 2014 1:51 pm

When the right one comes along, it will speak to you. :D

Re: How do you know which cub is right for you?

Wed Feb 12, 2014 3:09 pm

Llike Don said, you'll know when you look one over. I've had a bunch of them, and a couple I knew I didn't want the minute I got them.

I had a '49 that appeard to be complete, just a dirty old tractor. I got it running and it ran "ok" but was no champ. Then I started looking around, cleaning, etc., and everything I touched on it started to fall apart or leak. It had a real nice Woods 42" mower, and a guy stopped by looking for something cheap to mow with and wanted something to fix up. As soon as he showed interest in it, I let it go. It was a huge project just waiting to happen, and I just had no interest in it.

Another 65 lo boy that I found on e-bay was down in the Pocono Mtns, had a Wagner front loader, fast hitch, and a flail mower. The price was right so I grabbed it. Another forum member wanted the front loader, so I stopped on the way home and dropped the loader off at his place. It came with a few other attachments and parts I didn't want or need, so I sold those off, and ended up with very little initial $$ in the tractor. That one tuned up and ran beautiful, didn't have a single leak anywhere, but was pretty chopped up, scarred, missing parts/pieces, etc. I went through it and turned it in to a new one. It turned out beautiful and ran just as good as it looked. I was taking pictures of it one day and my boys were playing around on it. One of them bumped the starter button while the other was climbing on one of the rear tires, and it threw him off. No harm, he didn't get hurt, but it ended up on the sale block the next week and ended up going to a guy in Georgia.

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Sometimes, no matter what you think, the tractors just let you know whether or not you want them. I never thought I 'd get rid of a couple of them that I've had, but things change and it's just time to let them go. I've also sworn up and down that I'd never get another one that needed a complete restoration, just to fine one on Craigslist, or driving around out in the country and being in the right place at the right time.

I will say, if I were looking for a new one for myself, I'd start right here on the forum. Most of the tractors on here are well known not only by the owners but by the other forum members who have helped work on them over the years. There's a lot of fine equipment here, and always some nice ones for sale. There's also a TON of junk out on the internet, Craigslist, classifieds, etc., for sale! I laugh almost every time I look on Craigslist, at what some people are passing off as "perfect condition" "completely rebuilt" "runs like new".

Anyway, those are just my thoughts and words of ....., well, I guess I just better stop there.

Bill