How did those old guys do it?

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offrink
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Re: How did those old guys do it?

Postby offrink » Sat Oct 25, 2014 2:42 pm

The land is unfarmable based on the angles of the hills and the fact that it's primarily sand. The previous owners had horses for the last 30+ years and that's like the grass and weeds down. For me traction was also an issue. I couldn't even back up to hills because I would lose traction about 15' from the bottom of the hills. One way up circle around and mow. Then back up circle around and mow.

Both front and back wheels are set up to be as light as possible. The tires are inflated to the manuals backs. Engine is finely tuned and runs great. Lots of tread on the tires. Basically in tiptop shape. How do you get the seat to go back further? I didn't think they made adjustable seats.

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Randy Tuura
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Re: How did those old guys do it?

Postby Randy Tuura » Sat Oct 25, 2014 6:10 pm

offrink wrote:...How do you get the seat to go back further? I didn't think they made adjustable seats.


Take the little tool box off by the battery case and you'll find two large hex head screws going into the axle housing. Take those out and move the whole seat post assembly back one notch. If it has already been moved back, well, maybe you can have a welding shop make a new tab with a third set of holes...

I've been trying to loosen those two screws now for a couple of years. The heads have rusted away enough you can't quite tell what size they were. And I learned the hard way that WD-40 is not really a penetrating oil.
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Randy Tuura
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Re: How did those old guys do it?

Postby Randy Tuura » Sat Oct 25, 2014 6:17 pm

>>How did those old guys do it?<<

I ask myself that a lot. Especially when I see film of logging crews with no power equipment logging off trees that are 4 to six feet in diameter and hauling them out with mules. Or watching the Amish farmers at a barn raising. Some of them still do everything with horses. Making lumber at a job site by sawing logs into boards and then planing them - all by hand...

How did they do it? They just did because they had to.
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brewzalot
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Re: How did those old guys do it?

Postby brewzalot » Sat Oct 25, 2014 9:54 pm

[quote="offrink"]I spent 7 hour today mowing my 4 " back acres " of pasture.

I asked old dad for a wise mans answer to offrinks question- what I got was a wise guy answer.

He said that's why they're called " back achers "

He did say seriously though you didn't mow a pasture very often-that was free feed for the cows and a waste of fuel.

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randallc
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Re: How did those old guys do it?

Postby randallc » Sun Oct 26, 2014 5:12 am

Farm life was hard work and one thing to remember it was done day after day after day, so the soreness was always worked out. Dad and others worked the CCC and the men would use shovels all day long or life rocks. Carpenters do that today, day in and day out they are lifting, hammering, reaching, bending.
Now, at 67, I do it one day or part of a day and I'm plenty sore the next day. Back in the day, young men would work the farm all day, plowing with horses, and then walk 5 miles to a party. Dad couldn't take one of the work horses because they needed their rest for the next day, or so I was told.
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Randy Tuura
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Re: How did those old guys do it?

Postby Randy Tuura » Sun Oct 26, 2014 4:41 pm

This kind of explains it all...

20 reps.png
20 reps.png (312.12 KiB) Viewed 316 times
Randy
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Matt Kirsch
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Re: How did those old guys do it?

Postby Matt Kirsch » Mon Oct 27, 2014 1:36 pm

When you're running over "virgin ground" like that it always takes longer and is kind of rough.

Now that you can see what you're working with even just cleaning up the sticks and rocks will smooth things out a lot. Simply mowing regularly will eventually smooth most of the smaller whoops and bumps out. The larger ones might require some grading.

What always torqued me was that I could outwork any of the jocks in school and throw most any of them across the room but the school's so-called fitness tests pegged me as one of the flabbiest out of shape people in school.

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John *.?-!.* cub owner
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Re: How did those old guys do it?

Postby John *.?-!.* cub owner » Mon Oct 27, 2014 9:19 pm

Matt Kirsch wrote:What always torqued me was that I could outwork any of the jocks in school and throw most any of them across the room but the school's so-called fitness tests pegged me as one of the flabbiest out of shape people in school.
I know how that feels, however our PE coach had seen me in action a time or two and wrote me up as being good.

Randy Tuura wrote:This kind of explains it all...

20 reps.png
Yup, things like that along with being overweight are why I have two artificial hips and a bad back.
If you are not part of the solution,
you are part of the problem!!!

offrink
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Tractors Owned: 1954 farmall fcub, 1954 farmall super m
Location: Caledonia, MI

Re: How did those old guys do it?

Postby offrink » Tue Oct 28, 2014 9:21 am

This is the main trouble with some side hills that are about 2/3 this angle. Glad it's all done though. The snow plow is on the cub, oil changed, all lubed, and waiting on the snow!

I really hope it smoothed out!
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Steeper than it seems
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fl37
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Re: How did those old guys do it?

Postby fl37 » Tue Oct 28, 2014 11:11 am

offrink wrote:I spent 7 hour today mowing my 4 back acres of pasture. They haven't been mowed all year and I have a woods 59 and it took forever. This was the first time I mowed the property because we moved in mid December last year. Lots of sudden shifts as I went over hidden branches and holes. A couple of very steep and bumpy hills and had to go over all of the area at least twice but more likely three times. Now I'm sore. My 6'6" frame gets whipping around on some of those big bumps and turns.

So my question is, how did people 50 years ago spend so many hours on a tractor an not constantly get beaten up? Is being a foot to 6" shorter really make that much or a difference? Did they just get use to it? I had red paint running down my pant leg because it rubbed off the steering column.


Running over hidden holes--a good way to crack or complete break off that lower right flange on the block (the one with the hole for the water hose). That flange is a well-known weak point on the Cub block. Early year Cubs like my 1948 are particularly susceptible to that failure mode. Earlier this year I spent the better part of two weeks tediously welding that busted flange onto the block of my 1948 Cub. Learned a lot about welding cast iron.

Good luck

offrink
Cub Star!!
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Posts: 336
Joined: Thu Jan 02, 2014 4:23 pm
Zip Code: 49316
Tractors Owned: 1954 farmall fcub, 1954 farmall super m
Location: Caledonia, MI

Re: How did those old guys do it?

Postby offrink » Tue Oct 28, 2014 12:05 pm

I believe this was already broken by a previous owner and was reinforced by 1" angle iron between the front bolster and the around the rear part of the engine. Seems fairly strong because I've plowed last year with no issues.


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