Cub 22 mower pitman stick wood type

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marrstree
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Cub 22 mower pitman stick wood type

Postby marrstree » Fri Aug 12, 2016 8:47 am

Does anyone know authoritatively what type of hardwood was used in original 22 mower pitman sticks? I'm going to make a couple and would like them as authentic as possible.
Yes, I know several would probably work (hickory, ash, hard maple, chestnut) but I would like authentic.

No offense intended for anyone, but please don't respond "such-and-such would probably work" - I want to know what they WERE, not what "might work".

Thanks.
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Re: Cub 22 mower pitman stick wood type

Postby Shane Nelson » Fri Aug 12, 2016 9:05 am

That's like asking which oil is best. Oak, hickory or ash are all good choices and if the police of sickle arms tells you it's wrong tell them to get the correct one for you so they will sleep better at night. Weren't they painted from the factory?
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Re: Cub 22 mower pitman stick wood type

Postby Puffie40 » Fri Aug 12, 2016 9:50 am

Chipmaker wrote:Weren't they painted from the factory?

Mine, which is still original, is just varnished.

Its a lighter colored wood, my guess is white oak.

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Re: Cub 22 mower pitman stick wood type

Postby Jim Becker » Fri Aug 12, 2016 10:47 am

I doubt that there was a single "correct" answer. I don't think I've ever seen anything from Harvester that was more specific than "hard wood". It probably changed from time to time, as did the type of wood for many parts.

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Re: Cub 22 mower pitman stick wood type

Postby Our Pass Thyme » Fri Aug 12, 2016 12:23 pm

My pitman is made out of hickory.

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Re: Cub 22 mower pitman stick wood type

Postby clm2112 » Fri Aug 12, 2016 4:19 pm

I would venture I guess that, as Jim said, there isn't a specific species of wood called out for the pitman arm. Mine, from a 1955 Cub, is stripped down for repair. From the color and grain structure in the wood, I appears to be made of slab sawn Ash. No guarantee that the mower was actually 1955 production, since the receipt wasn't in the file with the rest of the docs.

Anyone happen to know where the Cub-22 mower was actually made? (i.e. which of the many post-WWII plants acquired by IHC manufactured it.) Might offer up a clue in finding where IHC sourced the wood.

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Re: Cub 22 mower pitman stick wood type

Postby marrstree » Sat Aug 13, 2016 9:06 am

I dug out my college wood identification blocks (yes, there was a college course for that 50 years ago...) and checked the three sticks I have. The one on it when I bought the mower in 2005 (probably not original) was hickory. The first replacement I bought, at that time, was hickory (was aftermarket, not original IH stock). The third one, that just failed, was 2009 after-market, and it was hard maple. After studying these three, I think that straight grained is more important than species. Still, I did find 8/4 hickory at my local woodworking store and fabricated a replacement yesterday.
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Re: Cub 22 mower pitman stick wood type

Postby WaMoo » Sat Aug 13, 2016 11:05 am

marrstree wrote: After studying these three, I think that straight grained is more important than species.


I think you're probably right. IH probably sourced different woods based on what they could get for the best price.

I see you're from Puyallup. I'm in Washington too. I use clear VG Doug Fir for my pitmans and I know it WILL work! :D
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Re: Cub 22 mower pitman stick wood type

Postby Scrivet » Sat Aug 13, 2016 12:01 pm

Keep in mind the pitman is designed as the weakest link in the system, the shear pin if you will. It is made to be broken, before something more involved does.

What type of wood is less important than the ability to do the job. Not easily broken, but not so hard as to never break. Always have a spare available.

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Re: Cub 22 mower pitman stick wood type

Postby Jim Becker » Sat Aug 13, 2016 1:30 pm

I believe the Cub-22 was made in Chicago with very late production probably moved to Memphis. That probably has no bearing on the type of wood as local sourcing would have generally been out of the question. Sourcing wood was a big thing for a company like Harvester. Here is an article about wood supplies from 1922. It can provide some insight into how big a thing it was. In later years a lot of wood parts were replaced by iron and steel so the picture probably changed. But wood supplies were probably shrinking faster than the demand.

Follow this link then go to page 2. The article is 3 pages.
http://content.wisconsinhistory.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/ihc/id/11165/show/11141/rec/4

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Re: Cub 22 mower pitman stick wood type

Postby Glen » Sat Aug 13, 2016 7:19 pm

Hi,
If you want an original pitman wood, try buying one at Case IH, they had the wood ready to install, 1 or 2 years ago when I asked. :)

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Re: Cub 22 mower pitman stick wood type

Postby clm2112 » Mon Aug 15, 2016 4:07 am

Jim Becker wrote:In later years a lot of wood parts were replaced by iron and steel so the picture probably changed. But wood supplies were probably shrinking faster than the demand.


Thanks, Very interesting site to peruse. The issues in post WWII era production and exhausted materials got me thinking that plant location might have had an impact on what was used (like re-purposing wood on-site that had been allocated to another war-time priority.) While searching around, it was neat to see what was made in the IHC Louisville plant under it's previous owner Curtiss-Wright.

From my school days in aero-engineering, the pitman arm isn't a really critical part. It has to be light-weight since it is reciprocating, decent tensile strength, not easily compressed to keep the riveted joints tight, and a bit of flexibility to absorb shocks from the cutting. Hickory makes sense, as would a number of other woods with similar properties. Doesn't explain mine being made of Ash, but then I don't know the life story of the mower on my cub... except that it had been used as a step too often and wound up split & wrapped in electrical tape to hold it together. :roll:


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