We are a dying breed

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J3 Driver
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Posts: 180
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2016 11:38 am
Zip Code: 17241
Tractors Owned: 1976 C-160 Wheelhorse
1995 JD F525
1998 JD 955 with 70A loader and 54 blade
JD 71 planter modified for use on Sleevehitch
Brinly plow, disk, and cultivator.
Son has a 1957 Cub
Circle of Safety: Y

Re: We are a dying breed

Postby J3 Driver » Mon May 29, 2017 6:49 pm

Rjpoog1989 wrote:I'm on both sides of this camp. I like tinkering with old stuff, and learning how things work. I don't, however, like to rely on these things. When my old truck stopped getting g me to work every day, I got a new one. I spent a lot of time under that ol truck working on it, but it had to go. Loosing my job was not an option. The cub has me equally frustrated at this point. Instead of mowing grass in 2 hours it now takes 3 1/2. Plus I'm out in the garage working on the cub instead of working on all the things I want the cub to help me do. Also, I really need to be cleaning and staining my deck, painting the garage, etc. I really do see a brand new John Deere in my near future. I'll keep the cub though to tinker with.


Get the Deere. And keep the cub. Then you can have the best of both worlds. :)
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AccMan
Posts: 20
Joined: Sat Apr 15, 2017 7:31 pm
Zip Code: 29407

Re: We are a dying breed

Postby AccMan » Mon May 29, 2017 7:03 pm

I'm with you on needing a tractor, but one that has enough HP, and is reliable. I am going to be working with the Wounded Warrior Foundation when I move and reliability is a must. I've spent a ton of time researching and pricing, and it appears JD doesn't want my business, but I will give another dealer a shot.

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LRiddle
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Posts: 487
Joined: Wed Mar 02, 2016 11:57 am
Zip Code: 44278
Tractors Owned: .
1951 Farmall Cub - Chesty

Woods 59 belly mower

54A blade

1956 Gravely L

Dozer blade

Tiller

Rotary Plow
Circle of Safety: Y
Location: Tallmadge, OH

Re: We are a dying breed

Postby LRiddle » Mon May 29, 2017 10:54 pm

I'm 35 and I prefer the old stuff. Much cheaper than new and built to last. I do all my own work on my house and vehicles. Mostly out of necessity though, I'm too cheap to pay someone to do my work. :D I plan on bringing my kids up the same way. When i change oil or do brakes, i have the kids in the garage with me at least seeing what it takes to do it. And speaking of brakes, my truck was in the dealer getting a recall fixed on it recently. They called and said my back brakes were shot and they can put on new pads and rotors for $400. :shock: Yeah, no thanks, I'll do it myself. People who don't know how to do simple work are just throwing money away.
Luke Riddle
Tallmadge, Ohio
1951 Cub - Chesty



"You can't believe everything you read on the internet." - Abraham Lincoln


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SONNY
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Zip Code: 61722

Re: We are a dying breed

Postby SONNY » Mon May 29, 2017 11:05 pm

Dave!!! I too was born in 46 and had been taught to work hard and be proud of yourself no matter what others think!!!! LOL!!!! thanks; sonny
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lliberto
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Posts: 221
Joined: Wed Jul 08, 2009 2:05 pm
Zip Code: 26062
Tractors Owned: 1947 Farmall Cub
http://farmallcub.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=94614

1952 Farmall Cub
http://farmallcub.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=100147

2011 Husqvarna YTH24V42LS
Location: WV, Weirton

Re: We are a dying breed

Postby lliberto » Tue May 30, 2017 12:13 am

I'm 49 and have always loved anything with an engine. I come by it naturally as my grandfather was a heavy equipment mechanic for a large mining company. He passed on before he could teach me much but he and my father inspired me. So through the years I've built many cars and trucks but it took my 8 year old son to prod me into buying an antique tractor. It was a package deal so we wound up with a 47 Cub and a 52 Cub. My 8 year old laid claim to the 47 and later this year we will begin working her. My point is there are still some in the younger generations that have respect for these old engines and will continue to keep them running. And one further note, we want to thank all of you for your expertise and advice. You've already helped us a lot and I'm sure you'll continue to help us in the future.

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Mr Ziffel
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Posts: 163
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2011 10:56 am
Zip Code: 20106
Tractors Owned: 1950 Cub with 193 plow, snow plow. Woods 59 mower. unknown disk, John Deere spring-tooth harrow, 2009 New Holland T1510, Massey Ferguson Mod 25 Disc (I think)
Circle of Safety: Y
Location: Virginia

Re: We are a dying breed

Postby Mr Ziffel » Tue May 30, 2017 1:32 am

I thought my son was more interested in Video games than mechanics when he was under 15, I tried to show him how to change belts, brakes and oil. Simple things. He always wanted to run back in the house and get back to the game. Well he is 21 now and Going to community college for mechanics. He is working for a Car Dealer and full time and making decent money in the shop. He is also currently trying to join the army. He keeps his nose clean and is respectful I am proud of the boy.
They can surprise you

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KETCHAM
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Posts: 5712
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2005 2:37 pm
Zip Code: 44645
eBay ID: kevinb2366
Tractors Owned: 47 Cub 48 Cub 50 H
Location: Marshallville Ohio

Re: We are a dying breed

Postby KETCHAM » Tue May 30, 2017 9:34 am

I have not paid anyone to work on my truck,cars,tractors or bikes.....I do let them mount and balance tires on the bikes...that's about it...Same with the house...I got lucky in life......God game me a fixin brain...Don't make enough to pay anybody to fix my stuff.....Kevin
47 CUB[Krusty] 49 CUB[Ollie] 50 H-- PLOWS DISCS MOWERS AND lots more stuff!!Life is to short -Have fun now cause ya ain't gonna be here long!!!!

Matt Kirsch
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Location: Rochester, NY

Re: We are a dying breed

Postby Matt Kirsch » Tue May 30, 2017 10:12 am

Would it surprise you to learn that your parents and/or grandparents were also a part of a "dying breed" of their own, and figured the world was doomed if left in your hands? Your generation figured things out and managed to get along. My generation is getting there. The next one will figure it out too.

Speaking of interest in old tractors in general, you have to consider that two generations ago a much larger swath of the population still lived on farms, so you guys got to see the equipment in action, what it could do, and experienced the sounds and smells associated. These days kids just see the tractors sitting there in a row, have never been anywhere near a farm, and we're expecting them to take the same level of interest?

I bet if you looked exclusively at farm families, the level of interest on a per-capita level is the same as it ever was. The main difference is that there are fewer and fewer farm families all the time as farms get larger and larger. Of course the interest has shifted to newer tractors. For a 70 year old guy, "Granddad's tractor" might have been an F20. For a 60 year old guy, it could be an M. For a 50 year old guy, it might be a 560. For a 40 year old guy, it would be an 856. For a 30 year old guy, it's a 1086. For a 20 year old guy, it's a 7130 Magnum.

Clip
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Zip Code: 28479
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Re: We are a dying breed

Postby Clip » Tue May 30, 2017 11:00 am

Thanks to you old farts, this 28 year old was able to get the '49 FCub running like a top, as well as a IH C2 and Pennington 600 mower deck. Looking forward to getting more questions answered when I start on the '57 and lending a hand on here where I'm able. Thanks!

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KETCHAM
10+ Years
10+ Years
Posts: 5712
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2005 2:37 pm
Zip Code: 44645
eBay ID: kevinb2366
Tractors Owned: 47 Cub 48 Cub 50 H
Location: Marshallville Ohio

Re: We are a dying breed

Postby KETCHAM » Tue May 30, 2017 1:16 pm

There are exceptions to all rules of course....But the odds are slipping fast....a lot of my buddies used to sleep in tents....Not so much anymore...time goes on for sure....interests change [mine have]Kevin......I still use my cubs a lot though!!!!
47 CUB[Krusty] 49 CUB[Ollie] 50 H-- PLOWS DISCS MOWERS AND lots more stuff!!Life is to short -Have fun now cause ya ain't gonna be here long!!!!

k hutchins
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Posts: 292
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2012 5:48 pm
Zip Code: 48843
Tractors Owned: 1948 Farmall Cub
193 plow
1948 snow/grading blade
Woods 59 C3
Cub 144 cultivator
Cub 22 mower
Cub 172 one row planter
Original manuals for all the above

Re: We are a dying breed

Postby k hutchins » Sun Jun 04, 2017 9:57 am

I count myself among the dying breed. I have been working around and on my '48 Cub (Work Horse) my whole life. First with my dad, who had me on it as soon as I could reach the pedals (had to brace my foot against the hood to pull back the hand lift). I now use it just to plow snow and mow 5 acres. It takes me a bit longer than neighbors with their new fancy zero turns, but the seat time on something I've been tinkering on for over 50 yrs is actually enjoyable.
Today's generation will probably never develop a relationship with a machine the way we all have, and some will never know that love/hate relationship. My Cub is more than a machine, it's a reminder to me of my father, my childhood, and simpler times. I'm not a mechanic, but learned enough to keep it going and do the repairs when necessary. It also taught me that I shouldn't underestimate my abilities, out of necessity I've repaired appliances, small engines, and other "throw away" items just because of a never say die attitude I gained from lessons taught by working on the Cub with dad.
Thanks for letting me reminisce a bit. You guys are a great help to all who ask.
Thanks again,
Hutch
Why is there never enough time to do the job right, but always enough time to do it over. :?:

offrink
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Zip Code: 49316
Tractors Owned: 1954 farmall fcub, 1954 farmall super m
Location: Caledonia, MI

Re: We are a dying breed

Postby offrink » Sun Jun 04, 2017 2:33 pm

I've heard those zero turn mowers are really bumpy and bad on the back. I think the wheels are to small.

jsfarmall
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Zip Code: 72454

Re: We are a dying breed

Postby jsfarmall » Mon Jun 05, 2017 8:43 pm

Well I'm 28 but the newest tractor I own is my grandads 53 SM, got 2 48 cubs, one of which was a rescue I'm putting back together now, and a 44 H. But I do agree, very few people my age have the same appreciation for the old iron. I'm gonna teach my little.boy so hopefully he will have the same or more than me.

Smokeycub
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Zip Code: 44266
Tractors Owned: 48 F Cub #11678
65 Cub Cadet 104
70 450C JD loader
67 Cub Cadet 107
90 B7100HST-D Kubota
72 Cub Cadet 149
54 Super C
Circle of Safety: Y
Location: Ravenna, Ohio

Re: We are a dying breed

Postby Smokeycub » Tue Jun 06, 2017 7:27 am

I'm in my mid 60's and didn't grow up on a farm, however my mother grew up on a dairy farm in Western Pa. and her brother took it over. My Uncle had four sons around my age and as a kid I would go there in the summers to "help out". Dairy farms require a great deal of work and a daily grind that never lets up, i.e. milking, feeding, cleaning stalls, letting cattle out and getting them back in. One's day would always start before dawn and often went on until after dark. This particular dairy had it's own processing and bottling plant and a number of home delivery routes. My Uncle kept a small fleet of Farmall tractors and the equipment that goes with haying. I would always be there when it was time to bring in the hay. There were no Cubs but he had an A and a number of H's and M's. Back then it was all smaller square bales of hay, lots of physical labor, and one still had to deal with all the daily chores noted above. He processed several kinds of milk (skim, whole, chocolate), made cottage cheese, butter, and offered eggs - all available through his home delivery service. That farm is still in business but is no longer in the family and has been reduced to wholesale milk only because of state health mandates if I remember correctly. In my opinion - that's a dying breed - men that work that hard every day for years on end. That sort of hard work had such a profound affect on my four cousins that all of them pursued "professional careers" and wanted nothing to do with farming, yet I don't think any one of them would want it any differently - growing up on a farm.

Anyway, that's where I learned to love old iron and Farmalls in general. The sights, sounds, and smells of old machinery will be with me forever. :tractor:
Ray
Smokeycub
Attachments - 193 plow - 144 cultivator - 22 mower - 28A disc harrow - 54 leveling blade - Woods 59C2 - drag harrows - Mott D9 flail - flat belt pulley
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The squeaky wheel may get the grease but it's usually the first to be replaced!

DickB
5+ Years
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Posts: 414
Joined: Sun Aug 05, 2012 7:01 am
Zip Code: 00000
Tractors Owned: 1955 Cub Fast Hitch
sickle bar
land plow
harrows
snow plow
manure spreader
hayrake, rope pull
variety of cultivators
Wagner WM-1 bucket loader
rear carrier -- homemade
Location: Berkshire hills

Re: We are a dying breed

Postby DickB » Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:35 am

Matt Kirsch wrote:Would it surprise you to learn that your parents and/or grandparents were also a part of a "dying breed" of their own, and figured the world was doomed if left in your hands? Your generation figured things out and managed to get along. My generation is getting there. The next one will figure it out too.

Speaking of interest in old tractors in general, you have to consider that two generations ago a much larger swath of the population still lived on farms, so you guys got to see the equipment in action, what it could do, and experienced the sounds and smells associated. These days kids just see the tractors sitting there in a row, have never been anywhere near a farm, and we're expecting them to take the same level of interest?

I bet if you looked exclusively at farm families, the level of interest on a per-capita level is the same as it ever was. The main difference is that there are fewer and fewer farm families all the time as farms get larger and larger. Of course the interest has shifted to newer tractors. For a 70 year old guy, "Granddad's tractor" might have been an F20. For a 60 year old guy, it could be an M. For a 50 year old guy, it might be a 560. For a 40 year old guy, it would be an 856. For a 30 year old guy, it's a 1086. For a 20 year old guy, it's a 7130 Magnum.


Matt hits on solid facts here. There's a newer development however, at least in rural parts of New England, and that is the growth of small to medium sized organic farms that for some 20 or so years have used affordable equipment for mostly vegetable farming. Old rototillers and old tractors enable these farmers to do more than a hoe can do. lkMany of these farms make a living out of it.

Over time larger farming efforts have sprung up and these often come with larger capital investments and the wealthier farms have contemporary tractors and such. Really large and older farms that are organic (a rarity) keep the old gear along with the smart farmhands who know how to make the old contraptions work. Lots of older hay balers, tractors, tedders and implements galore sprawl out on the large farms. Old farms that are not organic, but come from generations of a family living on the land, have barn yards that are filled with gear for gawking...mostly old working stuff...and old and young working farmers.

The guys at the IH-Case parts department could probably attest to the huge number of Cubs working on farms -- there's a good business in keeping the parts on hand. The Trailer Queen Cubs are a minority...at least I'm hoping that...since so many of the Cubs are out there working away.


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