Repacking front bearings

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ShawnAgne
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Repacking front bearings

Postby ShawnAgne » Wed Jan 10, 2018 5:22 pm

Have one of the front wheels off to fix a flat and got me thinking. Should I repack the front bearings? I have no clue when it was done last. Seems to be ok, but then not sure what I'd be looking for if it wasn't. Thoughts?
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Re: Repacking front bearings

Postby ricky racer » Wed Jan 10, 2018 5:42 pm

You're correct, now is a good time to do it. Like you said, hard telling when they were last greased.
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Re: Repacking front bearings

Postby clemk » Wed Jan 10, 2018 7:01 pm

X 2. Not knowing when they were done last then no time like the present
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Re: Repacking front bearings

Postby ShawnAgne » Wed Jan 10, 2018 7:59 pm

Is there any trick to pulling it apart and getting to the bearings?
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Re: Repacking front bearings

Postby Glen » Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:15 pm

Hi,
Below is a page from the Cub owner's manual showing how to grease the front wheel bearings.
The manual says grease them every 500 hours of use, or every 6 months.
Sometimes the outer bearing can get tight on the shaft, if it has not been apart in years.
Leave the inner bearing and seals on the shaft, like it says, and wash them there. :)

http://farmallcub.com/rudi_cub/www.clea ... e%2023.jpg

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Re: Repacking front bearings

Postby Larry in WNY » Wed Jan 10, 2018 9:46 pm

The outer bearing cover is threaded on. After that's off there is a castle nut and cotter pin. The hub can be removed after that.
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Re: Repacking front bearings

Postby BigBill » Wed Jan 10, 2018 9:54 pm

Everything should be changed gear and motor oil wise when we first purchase these tractors. They should be greased and the front hubs repacked. I see many neglected tractors.
I'm technically misunderstood at times i guess its been this way my whole life so why should it change now.

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Re: Repacking front bearings

Postby Stanton » Thu Jan 11, 2018 7:32 am

Shawn, it's pretty straight forward. Have a couple big rags handy to wipe off excess, old grease. A good time to use a pair of Nitrile gloves, if you've so inclined.

If you haven't started this already, then I'd suggest getting an old 3-ring binder or other such notebook and begin keeping maintenance records of repairs and their dates. This has really helped me know exactly what was done to which tractor and when.
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Re: Repacking front bearings

Postby Shane Nelson » Thu Jan 11, 2018 7:40 am

Stanton wrote:If you haven't started this already, then I'd suggest getting an old 3-ring binder or other such notebook and begin keeping maintenance records of repairs and their dates. This has really helped me know exactly what was done to which tractor and when.

Really good advice right here Stanton. I try to keep notes on all oil changes on everything we have, mowers, vehicles, tractors etc. I note the date and the mileage or hours on the meter if it has one. If I have to replace a part on something it is noted and dated. I keep notes on when I changed windshield wipers on vehicles for some reason. I try to crank small engines monthly but I keep notes of when I did it last. I use the note feature on my phone instead of a paper though.
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Re: Repacking front bearings

Postby Stanton » Thu Jan 11, 2018 8:04 am

Shane Nelson wrote:
Stanton wrote:If you haven't started this already, then I'd suggest getting an old 3-ring binder or other such notebook and begin keeping maintenance records of repairs and their dates. This has really helped me know exactly what was done to which tractor and when.

Really good advice right here Stanton. I try to keep notes on all oil changes on everything we have, mowers, vehicles, tractors etc. I note the date and the mileage or hours on the meter if it has one. If I have to replace a part on something it is noted and dated. I keep notes on when I changed windshield wipers on vehicles for some reason. I try to crank small engines monthly but I keep notes of when I did it last. I use the note feature on my phone instead of a paper though.


Thanks. I do similar. Date, hour meter (for Cub Cadets), Description of what work was done, parts and numbers replaced or repaired, etc. Anything that may be important 6 to 12 months later that will help inform me of what was done.

Also do it because...I just can't remember those kind of things any more. :oops:
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Re: Repacking front bearings

Postby Rick Spivey » Thu Jan 11, 2018 8:11 am

The correct way to pack a bearing, as I was taught (speaking of a cleaned bearing removed from the vehicle):
Clean the bearing with a solvent or cleaner, such as kerosene, varsol, etc.
Use compressed air to dry it and remove any particles, but don't spin the dry bearing with the air.
Place a "dollop" of grease in the palm of you led hand (a tablespoon or more).
Hold the bearing in your right hand (lefties reverse these hands) with the larger cone towards your thumb; the larger cone usually has the larger opening in the cage in which to pack the grease.
Use the edge of the cage to "nibble" away at the grease pile in you other hand. You will see the grease moving between the rollers into the cage.
Rotate the bearing slightly and continue to nibble away, until you have completed a whole revolution.
Now you have grease down inside the bearing where it can do you some good.

Some people just rub the grease over the outside of the bearing, hoping to get enough down into it. This way insures it is done properly.
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Re: Repacking front bearings

Postby Bill Hudson » Thu Jan 11, 2018 9:25 am

Rick Spivey wrote:The correct way to pack a bearing, as I was taught (speaking of a cleaned bearing removed from the vehicle):
Clean the bearing with a solvent or cleaner, such as kerosene, varsol, etc.
Use compressed air to dry it and remove any particles, but don't spin the dry bearing with the air.
Place a "dollop" of grease in the palm of you led hand (a tablespoon or more).
Hold the bearing in your right hand (lefties reverse these hands) with the larger cone towards your thumb; the larger cone usually has the larger opening in the cage in which to pack the grease.
Use the edge of the cage to "nibble" away at the grease pile in you other hand. You will see the grease moving between the rollers into the cage.
Rotate the bearing slightly and continue to nibble away, until you have completed a whole revolution.
Now you have grease down inside the bearing where it can do you some good.

Some people just rub the grease over the outside of the bearing, hoping to get enough down into it. This way insures it is done properly.


You betcha!!!

Bill
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Re: Repacking front bearings

Postby Urbish » Thu Jan 11, 2018 9:48 am

Rick Spivey wrote:The correct way to pack a bearing, as I was taught (speaking of a cleaned bearing removed from the vehicle):
Clean the bearing with a solvent or cleaner, such as kerosene, varsol, etc.
Use compressed air to dry it and remove any particles, but don't spin the dry bearing with the air.
Place a "dollop" of grease in the palm of you led hand (a tablespoon or more).
Hold the bearing in your right hand (lefties reverse these hands) with the larger cone towards your thumb; the larger cone usually has the larger opening in the cage in which to pack the grease.
Use the edge of the cage to "nibble" away at the grease pile in you other hand. You will see the grease moving between the rollers into the cage.
Rotate the bearing slightly and continue to nibble away, until you have completed a whole revolution.
Now you have grease down inside the bearing where it can do you some good.

Some people just rub the grease over the outside of the bearing, hoping to get enough down into it. This way insures it is done properly.


That's the way my dad taught me. I also have a bearing packer from Harbor Freight that consists of two cones that thread together to clamp the bearing and the center of the threaded shaft is hollow with a grease zerk. I have used it much over the years with great success. It's slightly less messy than the palm method, easier, but probably a little bit slower.

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Re: Repacking front bearings

Postby MiCarl » Thu Jan 11, 2018 9:57 am

I just did mine yesterday. Very old grease with the solids pushed out of the bearings and just some oil on the bearings themselves.

A couple tips that aren't in the manual:
1) Unscrew the "hub cap" before you jack up the tractor.
2) It's not necessary to unbolt the wheel from the hub - it's just as easy to do with the wheel bolted to the hub.
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Re: Repacking front bearings

Postby Shane Nelson » Thu Jan 11, 2018 10:01 am

Urbish wrote:
Rick Spivey wrote:The correct way to pack a bearing, as I was taught (speaking of a cleaned bearing removed from the vehicle):
Clean the bearing with a solvent or cleaner, such as kerosene, varsol, etc.
Use compressed air to dry it and remove any particles, but don't spin the dry bearing with the air.
Place a "dollop" of grease in the palm of you led hand (a tablespoon or more).
Hold the bearing in your right hand (lefties reverse these hands) with the larger cone towards your thumb; the larger cone usually has the larger opening in the cage in which to pack the grease.
Use the edge of the cage to "nibble" away at the grease pile in you other hand. You will see the grease moving between the rollers into the cage.
Rotate the bearing slightly and continue to nibble away, until you have completed a whole revolution.
Now you have grease down inside the bearing where it can do you some good.

Some people just rub the grease over the outside of the bearing, hoping to get enough down into it. This way insures it is done properly.


That's the way my dad taught me. I also have a bearing packer from Harbor Freight that consists of two cones that thread together to clamp the bearing and the center of the threaded shaft is hollow with a grease zerk. I have used it much over the years with great success. It's slightly less messy than the palm method, easier, but probably a little bit slower.

My dad taught me the same way. I bought one of those bearing packers you speak of 8+ years ago and have yet to use it, I keep doing it the way dad taught me.
God is good, all the time!
Every home is a school, what are you teaching?
Make prayer a 1st priority, instead of a last resort.
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