Source for Tires

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Waif
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Re: Source for Tires

Postby Waif » Thu Feb 15, 2018 10:47 am

My beads were corroded onto the rims. One was real bad. Enough to cut it off.
Would not have been a solo job for me now a days.
If your tire place has experience with tractor tires , they might be a good back up resource. Their price would certainly not bother me at all. And I'm thrifty. Usually.

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SAAndrus
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Re: Source for Tires

Postby SAAndrus » Thu Feb 15, 2018 11:02 am

Waif wrote:Blue line on tube goes towards the rim.

A friend who worked industrial tires a long time acquired and mounted mine.
His lube of choice ,WD 40 for bead areas. Guess it does have a use.
Keeping the valve stem from falling back into the rim is worth noting when positioning tube.......


WD 40 is great at removing tar! I was working on putting up.a patio cover once and got tar all over my hands from the roof shingles. I was thinking gas but the ole home owner said "come here son, let me see your hands." He sprayed some on my hands and immediately the tar started coming off. Not as harsh as gas on the skin.

Hope this helps.
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Re: Source for Tires

Postby Matt Kirsch » Thu Feb 15, 2018 11:43 am

Everybody charges extra for mounting, even the rural tire dealers. Usually it's worth the extra because they have pneumatic/hydraulic bead breakers that will shove the tire right off the rim, and the proper tools in general. They make it look easy.

For lube, I picked up a pail of tire lube paste from Miller tire at a tractor show a couple years ago. Tongue in cheek, I call it "astro glide" because of how well it works. The instructions say to dilute it with water, but in pure paste form a little bit goes a long way and it's real slick stuff.

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MiCarl
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Re: Source for Tires

Postby MiCarl » Thu Feb 15, 2018 12:32 pm

For $20 apiece have them done. Not worth the hassle and if you puncture a tube you'll come out behind.

If you're planning to re-use the tubes check if the installer will do that.
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lyle11
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Re: Source for Tires

Postby lyle11 » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:49 pm

I used the SUV drive on method to break the bead. Worked real fast on the Cub tire but failed to budge a Farmall H tire. Anyway, my original point was that if you can’t find what you want locally, or at one of the online sellers like Tucker, a new blemished tire is another option to consider. This place has a very limited supply but had what I wanted and I found the site thorough and the guy I talked to was well informed and helpful.

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Re: Source for Tires

Postby Jim Becker » Thu Feb 15, 2018 4:49 pm

Waif wrote:
Jim Becker wrote:
Waif wrote:His lube of choice ,WD 40 for bead areas.

Nope. Petroleum based.

Whoa Nelly.
How much petroleum we talkin? Ingredients derived from petroleum does not mean the same as petroleum.

I'd say that things like plastic and synthetic rubber are "derived from petroleum". Things like naptha, kerosene, and anything else obtainable by simple distillation of crude oil is "petroleum". Most "petroleum" products will eventually eat up most things "derived from petroleum".

The actual composition of WD-40 varies with the type container, and evidently has changed over time. According to some old MSDS sheets, it had some surfactants and was mostly naptha. (Surfactants are the active ingredients of detergents and could help produce the "water displacing" claim.) Newer MSDS sheets don't list surfactants but do show 20 to 35 % petroleum base oil and enough hydrocarbons to bring the can up to at least the 90% mark (100% of the bulk cans). That makes WD-40 almost entirely "petroleum".

Here is a web page that backs this up with analysis of the product. http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/general/wd40-297120/

I would not use WD-40 (petroleum) to lube up a tire bead (derived from petroleum). The longer the exposure, the more it is likely to do damage. Tires in heavy use that won't last long probably have less to risk ones that will be in service for many years.

Waif
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53 F-Cub W/Loader.
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Re: Source for Tires

Postby Waif » Thu Feb 15, 2018 5:40 pm

Jim Becker wrote:
Waif wrote:
Jim Becker wrote:Nope. Petroleum based.

Whoa Nelly.
How much petroleum we talkin? Ingredients derived from petroleum does not mean the same as petroleum.

I'd say that things like plastic and synthetic rubber are "derived from petroleum". Things like naptha, kerosene, and anything else obtainable by simple distillation of crude oil is "petroleum". Most "petroleum" products will eventually eat up most things "derived from petroleum".

The actual composition of WD-40 varies with the type container, and evidently has changed over time. According to some old MSDS sheets, it had some surfactants and was mostly naptha. (Surfactants are the active ingredients of detergents and could help produce the "water displacing" claim.) Newer MSDS sheets don't list surfactants but do show 20 to 35 % petroleum base oil and enough hydrocarbons to bring the can up to at least the 90% mark (100% of the bulk cans). That makes WD-40 almost entirely "petroleum".

Here is a web page that backs this up with analysis of the product. http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/general/wd40-297120/

I would not use WD-40 (petroleum) to lube up a tire bead (derived from petroleum). The longer the exposure, the more it is likely to do damage. Tires in heavy use that won't last long probably have less to risk ones that will be in service for many years.


What is derived from petroleum ,( mainly mineral oil in this case , and note that it is safe on most paints and plastics)is also what dissipates/ dries rapidly , leaving what?
A very faint wax. Not like pouring gas in a styrofoam cup.

Were WD to leave an oil residue that can enter and degrade rubber ( like transmission fluid can for example, or water removing water spots ) then of course it should not be used.
Petroleum derived does not mean compatibility ,or non compatibility. Its ( a products) effect and application does. Mineral oil is not crude oil.

Regardless ,have a good day.


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