Re: Farmall A Underside

Thu Oct 10, 2013 8:57 am

Eugene wrote:First thing I do after tractor purchase is to pressure spray, clean up, the entire tractor.
AgTires4295 wrote:Are there any spots more sensitive to water (other than the coil area obviously) than others?
Cover and keep the spray away from the starter, generator, and ignition system. Do not pressure spray the radiator. Just watch where and what you are spraying.

High pressure sprayers with a narrow stream pattern will peel paint, cut rubber and insulation.

You can use a degreaser or solvent prior to pressure spraying. Most of the tractor is constructed from cast, steel, or heavy sheet metal - so no problem.

Typically I trailer the machine to the car wash. Spend $5 or $10-. Use the solvent spray then pressure spray off the engine tractor. This leaves the mess for some one else to clean up. Leave the tractor on the trailer for a couple of days to completely dry out.

Just another thought. Convert to 12 volt single wire alternator, rather than spending money on the generator and regulator. Cheaper, much cheaper. The starter will need to be rebuilt.

Re: Farmall A Underside

Thu Oct 17, 2013 11:11 am

It looks to me like that is an original style starter with the "nub" for the saddle switch. It doesn't look like a worn down stud or nut. The 12 volt generator definitely isn't original to that tractor but is an original IH tractor generator. That Farmall A (built 1939-1946/1947) originally had a 6 volt system with a 6 volt generator that looked identical to that one. That generator you have came from a 1964 or later Farmall Cub, 140, 240, etc.

If you have a good 12 volt battery and some good battery cables (not the tiny ones at the auto parts store), it should start easy. I would check the generator and regulator before I converted it. It is likely that the generator still works, and it would buy you some time before spending the money on a conversion when it may not be necessary.

Re: Farmall A Underside

Thu Oct 17, 2013 2:42 pm

The access hole in the bottom-rear portion of the "torque tube" exposes the clutch pedal connecting rod and adjustment nuts. I am not aware of any cover supplied for this access hole.

I do not like how the battery ground cables are spliced under the deck. Electrically, current has to cross the exposed and corroded two-stud splice. The end terminals should be placed on one stud and be sandwiched together for best electrical contact. The exposed connector will continue to catch dirt and debris and corrode in that location and without a sealing cover. I recommend replacing the two-piece ground cable with a one-piece cable with hold-downs to prevent insulation damage. Six volt ignition systems do not tolerate poor electrical connections well. Low voltage (less than 6VDC) may be a good portion of your starting problems.

If you decide to replace the two-piece cable, make sure you use a 6V size replacement...most auto supply places stock 4 gauge cables which are suitable for 12V but not suitable for 6V (2 gauge) systems. I suffered with 12V cables on my tractor for many years before realizing this problem...the larger replacement really made a big difference in starting power.

Re: Farmall A Underside

Thu Oct 17, 2013 2:42 pm

The access hole in the bottom-rear portion of the "torque tube" exposes the clutch pedal connecting rod and adjustment nuts. I am not aware of any cover supplied for this access hole.

I do not like how the battery ground cables are spliced under the deck. Electrically, current has to cross the exposed and corroded two-stud splice. The end terminals should be placed on one stud and be sandwiched together for best electrical contact. The exposed connector will continue to catch dirt and debris and corrode in that location and without a sealing cover. I recommend replacing the two-piece ground cable with a one-piece cable with hold-downs to prevent insulation damage. Six volt ignition systems do not tolerate poor electrical connections well. Low voltage (less than 6VDC) may be a good portion of your starting problems.

If you decide to replace the two-piece cable, make sure you use a 6V size replacement...most auto supply places stock 4 gauge cables which are suitable for 12V but not suitable for 6V (2 gauge) systems. I suffered with 12V cables on my tractor for many years before realizing this problem...the larger replacement really made a big difference in starting power.