To those who think a Cub Buzz Saw is dangerous looking

Sat Aug 25, 2007 4:51 pm

You are a bunch of wusses. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


We cut our wood with this for many years, with no injuries. Thank God for that, because a lot of people were injured with them over the years.

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And with this addition we sharpened posts.

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This rig was my first introduction to making money on my own while in my teens. In the middle and early 60s I would sharpen posts for 5 cents per post, and they provided a helper to hand the posts to me and if they wanted them stacked , the helper was responsible for that too. Sharpening cedar posts I could make as much $11 per hour , that was 3.5 posts per minute, and on oak posts I could make up to $9 per hour, which is 3 posts per minute. I would hate to try that now though.

Here is a picture of our sickle grinder for the hay mower also.

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Sat Aug 25, 2007 5:06 pm

Call me a wuss, I wouldnt touch that thing

Sat Aug 25, 2007 6:47 pm

TexasTechTwentySomething wrote:Call me a wuss, I wouldnt touch that thing

I hear you! That thing looks like something out of a comic book. I can see it now - a tractor rumbling down the street with a saw on the bow, terrorizing the populace. "Tractor of Terror!" like a 50's horror movie, I think it'd be called...

Sat Aug 25, 2007 7:29 pm

PageRob wrote:
TexasTechTwentySomething wrote:Call me a wuss, I wouldnt touch that thing

I hear you! That thing looks like something out of a comic book. I can see it now - a tractor rumbling down the street with a saw on the bow, terrorizing the populace. "Tractor of Terror!" like a 50's horror movie, I think it'd be called...


I saw a movie on the boat it was set in Australia in the 60's or 70's.Long story short these guys were tring to kill a woman on her farm she used a W-6 or 9 it had a saw like that and run in to there truck for defense.I can't remember the name.

Sat Aug 25, 2007 8:43 pm

OMIGOD!! That looks like death incarnate!! As clumsy as I was as a youth (and even now), I would have cut my leg off with that thing.
Max

Sat Aug 25, 2007 8:47 pm

TexasTechTwentySomething wrote:Call me a wuss, I wouldnt touch that thing
The whole idea is not to touch it. :lol:

Sat Aug 25, 2007 9:02 pm

Just a part of farming then, ever notice a lot of old farmers were missing a diget or two. We never sharpened post but cut a lot of slabs for stove wood.
Every thing on a farm back then was dangerous if you didnt pay attention to what you was doing. This generation now would have had a hard time.
David

Sat Aug 25, 2007 9:20 pm

John:

Actually that is a pretty good improvement on what I learned to cut wood on. Imagine that a dedicated implement mounting attachment :!: Looks like you could cut a mean post with that.. -- clever.. It constantly amazes me what our parents and their parents were able to come up with to make work just a bit easier... :idea: :wink: :D

We never had a saw table such as what I have (which had been originally Em's Great Grand-Father's). That would have been heaven :!: What we had was a V-style wooden saw table clamped to 2 saw horses. The blade was on an arbor such as yours, the bed tilted which fed the wood into the saw. The work arbor and flat pulley used a long flat belt that was powered by my Grand Dad's Ford's/Mercury's etc., over the years. We would jack up the car. Block the front end with a log so it wouldn't come off of the jack, take off one rear tire and replace it with a rim that had a belt pulley bolted to it. This was the motive power.

Your H was a far cry from what we had. But back in the day as you know, you did with what you had. Thankfully I never had to cut wood like you did to earn money. My first job was hauling concrete block on a construction site for $0.25/hour -- that was big money back in 1964 :!: So I guess the mashed fingers I got from the concrete was a darn site better than losing part or all of a digit to a saw blade... :!:

Kids today are Wusses :!: Big time.. most would never do what we did never mind what our parents did when they were young..... :!:

On the other hand, most of us could not do what most kids do today.. technology has changed the world and we all must adapt or get left behind. Maybe that is why our kids are different.. especially in their view of work... :? :idea: :!:

Sat Aug 25, 2007 10:49 pm

You tell 'em John, DON'T touch it! When I got my Great Aunt's Cub, she said there was a buzz saw for it, but it was nowhere to be found. :cry: Wish it would have been there still. Nice looking setup BTW. Is that the H Cub-Bud and Co. restored?

Wow

Sun Aug 26, 2007 6:51 am

A lot of the ones in my area ended up in the scrap pile. I saw some in use when I was a kid 3 guys could cut a whole lot of wood up quick. But I guess the danger outweighed the production. I always wanted one though

Sun Aug 26, 2007 8:00 am

The one on the H is a bit more primitive than the one we used on a "green" tractor. It had a tilting table for holding the cordwood. A jig on it was used to cut the rafter ends for our house. Sure saved a bunch of work with a handsaw. I once knew a man who fell into such a saw. Caught his face and shoulder. He lost an eye and most of the use of his left arm, but did survive.

Sun Aug 26, 2007 8:26 am

Rudi's post reminds me of my grandfather telling about sliding off a muddy road on a hill in his Model A. Tied a rope around a tree on the other side of the road, tied the other end to the rear wheel or axle(CRS)somehow and let the car pull itself up the hill and back on to the road.

Andy

Sun Aug 26, 2007 8:34 am

ya that does look a bit dangerous and i am a carpenter for a living for 15 yrs now and i would probably hessitate for a minute to get up enough steam to try it . :o

Sun Aug 26, 2007 10:32 am

We use a lot of that style here in Mn. Or I should say did. It was A tool that safty never left your mind. but they work great. and with that style you always had 2 or 3 guys doing the job . 2 cutting and 1 caring the 4footers over to the saw and a continious rotation.

Sun Aug 26, 2007 10:48 am

As dangerous as it looks, you have to remember back then, there were fewer lawyers and common sense was more prevalent. :?