Fluid in Tires

Sun Jul 06, 2008 10:35 pm

Calcium Cloride? What is the best way to get it out of my tires, A friend said drain them on a gravel road. I don't want to get in trouble.

It is in my Super M Tires. The rims are rusting out.


Thanks Jason

Re: Fluid in Tires

Sun Jul 06, 2008 11:40 pm

That would most likely work. I would take it to the local tire shop and let them pump it out.

Re: Fluid in Tires

Mon Jul 07, 2008 12:14 am

Pull it over to a ditch. Put the valve stem at the bottom and let er rip. I will warn you, that stuff will kill weeds and grass. Also, any bare metal around the Ca Chloride will flash rust in no time. Better off calling your local tire place and having them pumped out!! Dumping them on a county road will get you in trouble.

Red56

Re: Fluid in Tires

Mon Jul 07, 2008 8:38 am

You putting in anything afterwards???I like the weight of the fluid.Kevin

Re: Fluid in Tires

Mon Jul 07, 2008 7:00 pm

i would have it pumped out thats the best way to stay out of trouble,, i let some fly on the gravel drive about 4 years ago,on a hot humid days it still seems to show back up in the gravel, no weeds grow there, thats good

Re: Fluid in Tires

Mon Jul 07, 2008 7:01 pm

I'm frugal - well cheap. I just finished draining the fluid from two rears, 13.6 x 28s, then repairing the rims.

I parked the tractor on a concret pad on the acreage. Jacked up one side. Valve stem at top of wheel - then removed in. Rotated the valve stem to the bottom then let the tractor down. Next morning and after a rain there was about 5 gallons of fluid still in the tire. Dismounted the tire. Dismounted the rim. Drained out the balance of the fluid.

Took rim, tire, and tube to town. Washed all off. The tube was reusable. I put about 15 gallons of water in the tube, sloshed it around then drained. I did this 3 times.

The fluid did kill the grass - for a while.

Re: Fluid in Tires

Mon Jul 07, 2008 8:33 pm

ih-cubcadet-man wrote:i would have it pumped out thats the best way to stay out of trouble,, i let some fly on the gravel drive about 4 years ago,on a hot humid days it still seems to show back up in the gravel, no weeds grow there, thats good


If anyone wanted to cause trouble he'd have to be from the local or state government. The calcium chloride is the same thing they add to sodium chloride when they salt the roads when it's really cold.

It's a good weed killer and especially good for dust control since it attracts moisture from the air. I do have a problem where some ran from the driveway to one of my Austrian pines. It's not dead but seriously ill.

Re: Fluid in Tires

Mon Jul 07, 2008 8:56 pm

not sure how or where to drain them but noticed someone mentioned refilling them with something the local New Holland dealer puts in windshield wash fluid seems to work and is enviromentally friendly guess no one really like the calcium to messy and rots out the rim if leak is undetected for a while

good luck

Re: Fluid in Tires

Mon Jul 07, 2008 9:52 pm

I believe they used to put the calcium on gravel roads to knock down dust, buy not anymore. My next door neighbor who is in his late eighties used to take all his old oil from trucks, tractors, etc. and lay that on the gravel to stop dust. Bet the EPA loved that!!! :o :o

Red56

Re: Fluid in Tires

Fri Jul 11, 2008 8:29 pm

not sure how or where to drain them but noticed someone mentioned refilling them with something the local New Holland dealer puts in windshield wash fluid seems to work and is enviromentally friendly guess no one really like the calcium to messy and rots out the rim if leak is undetected for a while

Washer fluid has 2 problems. One, its much lighter per gallon and second, it costs quite a bit more than calcium. Most of the time calcium is a problem because of time. The wheels assemblies rusting out were most likely filled around the time of the 2nd world war. If you just changed tubes once every 10yrs you probably wouldn't have any trouble.

Re: Fluid in Tires

Fri Jul 11, 2008 8:41 pm

If you want to refill the tires I would use water and add about 5 gal. of antifreeze . you can get an adapter from tractor supply to add water but put the antifreeze in first.
David

Re: Fluid in Tires

Sat Jul 12, 2008 9:48 am

These days OEM's are recommending only a 40% tire fill. Its better understood these days that tire flex is as important to traction as ballast and does not pack the soil, and as a side benefit ride better than rock hard 90% filled tires (oh my aching butt). Radial tires are even better at this. I think I am going with 100% air and try that plowing and see if it works ok.

Re: Fluid in Tires

Sun Jul 13, 2008 8:20 pm

Unless you need fluid for weight take it to a tire shop & have them pump it out &take the tires off the rims so you can fix the rims right. Trash the tubes as all of it won't come out & it gives new meaning to nasty. It won't help your hands either! Then you can sand blast, epoxy prime & paint the rims & it is history. Better to do it right one time!

Re: Fluid in Tires

Sun Jul 13, 2008 9:24 pm

An excellent way to fill the pin holes in cal clor eaten rims is a TIG torch and bronze rod. Car guys have been fixing pinholes in sheet metal this way for years now. Bigger holes can be backed up with a copper sheet and TIGed or MIGed over. You can use a torch and flux but TIG is faster and easier. Harbor Freight has a cool little DC only TIG/stick welder that just the treat for this, and many other resto tasks. I have one and it works well. Its also great for welding in those fender washers to rebuild the valve stem holes.

Re: Fluid in Tires

Sat Jul 19, 2008 7:08 am

I put a few extra pounds of air in my tires and after i got the valve core out put a plastic hose over the stem to collect the fluid in buckets,The mess was minimal.I just hung an extra set of wheel weights on and do not notice any difference in traction with no more mess.