Retiring to the Farm

Wed Feb 08, 2006 12:41 pm

In my line of work, we're constantly trying to develop strategies to accomodate the coming wave of baby boomers about to reach retirement age. One thing we've been doing is looking at how other nations are dealing with the problem.

My boss just shared with me an article that I thought would be interesting to some of you. It's about how there's a growing trend among Japanese boomers (or the "big lump" generation, as they're called there), to look at a career in farming after they retire from business.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11178537/site/newsweek/

Wed Feb 08, 2006 1:21 pm

lildog, Interesting article. As I am a baby boomer, I could understand their feelings. When Yazawa stated "return to the soil" I know what he's talking about. Many's the time I would sit down in the middle of a field and contemplate lifes ironies. Although Man has been domesticated, modernized and civilized, our inherent nature can't help but bleed through. Thanks for posting. I am not alone. :wink: Larry

Wed Feb 08, 2006 4:36 pm

if I remeber correctly form different articles I've read, the average farmer in Japan ony has aobut 2 cows and 3 or 4 acres. Retrting to a farm in Japan is like retiring to a rural yard in the U.S.

Wed Feb 08, 2006 5:10 pm

Interesting, If the retirees would retire on 300 sq. meters and cottage, That would only be about a 50X50 ft. area. Not a whole lot by our standards. But in their area, maybe it's a lot of land. :o Larry

Thu Feb 09, 2006 6:50 am

Now I know why I bought 40 acres just before I retired. Us depression babies have the same urge.

bill

Thu Feb 09, 2006 8:21 am

I completely understand. Although my lovely wife begs to differ, there is nothing like getting dirt (or grease) under your fingernails to relieve the stresses of modern life.

Thu Feb 09, 2006 8:41 am

Our retirement home is in the middle of 30 acres. I can't imagine it any other way. We're in our 15th year here in our own little world.

Thu Feb 09, 2006 2:31 pm

I can sure understand how they feel. Farming being in our blood thru many generations our little patch (5acres) will do us. We can still grow and reap our hay, raise cattle. what more could we ask for, and of course restore Farmalls. 8)

Thu Feb 16, 2006 12:20 pm

to me theres nothing like the smell of cut grass or soil after a day being chained to a desk. after living the hood in youngstown for a few years while in college, moving out to the county was a blessing
john

Sat Mar 25, 2006 6:19 am

I must admit it...I'd like to have a small farm (10 acres or so) with several barns (or one, GIANT pole barn). :wink: I have a lot of friends (outside of our retirement village here on the lake) that have farms and the older I get...the MORE I'd like to be plowin'...plantin'...and mowin'! :wink:

Even here in East Tennessee...the farms are being bought up faster than you can say "There goes another real estate auction" :cry: Property taxes are gowin' up as more young folks discover the southeast and it's easy way of livin'! :shock:

BUT, inspite of NOT livin' on a small farm, I must admit that warm summer evenings sittin' with Carol Elizabeth down on the boat dock, feeding the ducks and watchin' fish jump...while viewin' those spectacular Tennessee Orange sunsets...LIFE IS VERY WORTHWHILE JUST THE WAY IT'S TURNED OUT! :wink: