cub 154 oil leak

Sun May 06, 2007 8:31 pm

I need help with an oil leak from the oil pan. I don't know alot about tractors and want to know if I need a gasket or just need to reseal it.

Mon May 07, 2007 4:27 pm

I'd try re-torquing the bolts first. If that doesn't work, put on a new gasket.

Mon May 07, 2007 5:35 pm

I hope it is just the oil pan gasket but probably it is the rear main seal. Split the tractor by moving the engine foward. Replace the pan gasket too.

Mon May 07, 2007 7:28 pm

Like BigDog states. Try the easy stuff first. Tighten the pan bolts. They are only torqued down to about 10 inch lbs. It's a cork gasket and can fairly easily be replaced if necessary.

Question. How much of an oil leak do you have along the pan gasket? Cork gaskets do have a tendency to seep a bit as they age. If you have a car that is several years old - look at the base of the valve cover.

Eugene

Re: cub 154 oil leak

Mon May 07, 2007 7:58 pm

mowin'along:

First, Image to the greatest forum on the internet, and to the Cub Family. You will find that all the folks on this forum are kind, helpful and just full of Cub info and knowledge. They also happen to be the finest folks I have ever met :!: :D

Mowin'along wrote:I need help with an oil leak from the oil pan. I don't know alot about tractors and want to know if I need a gasket or just need to reseal it.


If you check the links below to the Cub Manual Server, then the Numbered Cubs, you will find the Owner's Manual, the TC-131 Parts Catalog. I don't have a Service Manual up for it yet, but the parts breakdown will help you visualize how it all goes together. Factor in the excellent advice from some of our pro's here, and you should be able to handle it no sweat..

Enjoy and welcome :!:

Ok, so here is the spiel Image:

I would suggest that you read this thread: New Members and Visitors, Please READ Prior to Posting. There are many great links to informative pages such as the ATIS FAQ's 1 and ATIS FAQ's 2, The Best of H.L. Chauvin who has written very interesting articles on troubleshooting common problems with your Cub. One of the other projects we have been working on and it will be a continuing effort is the How To Work on Your Cub - Maintenance Tips and Techniques. This the the place to go to get all the quick links to some very good articles written by many members of the forum on solving some of the problems we encounter as we repair, maintain and up-grade our Cubs. Keep looking for this to grow.


Also, you might want to visit the Cub Manual Server as there is tons of info on servicing, maintaining and re-building your Cub. In addition to this basic information, there are also a number of other useful tools available on the server. There is the Specialty Services page which has contact info for neat stuff like getting your seats recovered, buying quality Decals, Serial Number tags and a host of other neat items. Also there are the Parts Pages - both Used Parts Suppliers and New Parts Suppliers pages with links to quality dealers. I am always looking for YOUR favourite dealers for New and Used Parts to include here. These pages are intended to complement our Official FarmallCub.com Website Sponsors:

I would also recommend that you visit Binder Books and purchase the three most important manuals you can own for Maintenance, Repair and Rebuilding your Cub. These are the Owner's Manual, the GSS-1411 Service Manual and the TC-37F Parts Manual. Although they are available on the Cub Manual Server, it is better is you also have your own paper copy. Binder Books is the only Authorized IH Publication Reprint House and they have the best quality manuals available. Most other's are not of the same quality. Just a personal thought here, the I&T Shop Manuals, although helpful in some areas, really are not sufficient for the job. If you wish though, they are good additional reference works.

IF you really want to get the skinny on all things Cub, might I suggest you get a copy of Ken Updike's Farmall Cub and Cub Cadet's :?: . While you are at it Original Farmall Cub and Cub Cadet is Ken's latest addition to the series. Along with Guy Fay's Letter Series Originality Guide, these are three must have's in anyone's collection.

In addition to the above information, don't forget to check out the various articles that are available to help with your Repair, Restore, Rebuild or just your Maintenance Projects. There are a number of sub pages such as Electrolysis or Rust Zapper's, Maintenance Tips, Jigs and Techniques, Implement and Part Sketches and of course the Paint, Decals & Other Finish Questions which has the Paint Chart and the Paint Committee Decisions links.

Oh, and while the program still lasts.. you might want to check the Announcement: Navistar Free Gas Cap Offer - On-Line Form thread at the top of the Cub Forum and send away for the new style safety cap before that program runs out as well.

I truly hope that you enjoy your Cub and that you will be a frequent contributor to the forum. Again, Image to the Cub FamilyImage :D

Mon May 07, 2007 10:34 pm

If you do have to remove the pan, be sure the flange which clamps the gasket is straight all around the pan. That flange is soft and will pull uneven if over torqued. Once it is uneven--you will never stop a leak by tightening the bolts more!
Barn_cub

Tue May 08, 2007 7:32 am

I believe that the Permatex people still do make the silicone to repair oil pan and timing chain cover leaks without taking anything apart. Its good for fixing leaky gaskets only. You wash the area really clean and dry then apply the silicone and let it dry. I use a spotlite bulb on an extention cord to apply heat so it hardens better overnite. I been using a "Pro Seal" that I found at BIG A auto parts too it works good to if you can't find the permatex stuff.

I would sung up the gasket/pan bolts, wash the area really clean and if it still leaks check the crank oil seal too. If its the pan gasket I would go with the silicone next.

I used the permatex stuff on new cars when i was a car/jeep mechanic back in the early 70's and i know things have changed since then with a lot better products out there too. I have repaired leaky split cases on dirtbikes with the pro seal silicone too. The transmissions were leaking gear oil and leave a spot on the ground overnite thats unacceptable to me. I hate oil leaks.....

I have repaired many warped/bent auto tranny pans that someone over tightened using blocks of wood on a nice flat clean wooden bench. It can be done but it takes time to learn how to do it, trust me it works.

On a pan gasket I use silicone to hold the pan gasket in place and let it set for a while too. Now don't over tighten the pan bolts until the gasket squeezes out. Tightn the bolts just enough to were the gasket doesn't push out. As soon as you see it move out were the bolts are just a little, very little stop thats it, its tight enough.

On valve cover gaskets and side cover gaskets I like to use a weather stripping adhesive to hold the gasket firmly in place while assembling it.