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Farmall Cub • View topic - tomato

tomato

Thu Feb 04, 2010 7:56 am

I read that tomato plants should be planted laying down. Anybody ever do this?

Re: tomato

Thu Feb 04, 2010 8:13 am

Dan,

I have read about people that will lay down their tomato plants in furrows and cover, leaving only the top few leaves out. This seems to work for them. What I do is, after my ground is prepaired, dig a post hole, put about a handfull of bone meal in the bottom, pull off all leaves but the top pair, or "bud" as I call it, put it in the hole and cover up to the bud. Then water in good. This works for me. Everyone probably has their way of doing it. This is mine.

Billy

Re: tomato

Thu Feb 04, 2010 10:03 am

Dan , i use the lay down method, i dig a trench and fill with old manure, cover with and inch or two of dirt,which i have sifted to make it a better grade, lay the plant on side after removing all but the top two leaves and cover with dirt. this creates a larger root mass which converts to thicker plant structure which can hold larger fruit. the root mass being closer to the surface receives more sun and and can get the water to it better. i also bury a bottomless can next to the root mass. buying tomato plants that look like the have bolted,tall and skinny are perfect for this ,sellers usually want to get rid of them cheap.last year befor the blight i had alreadyu harvested plenty of tomato. i also use old cattle fencing to make a nice round cage and i plant atleast five to six foot apart. i run bamboo from cage to cage to create a terrace so once the plants reac three to four feet they can lay out on top like a grape arbor . water from below native tomato plants are not used to being watered from above. it works for me.

Re: tomato

Thu Feb 04, 2010 10:42 am

Another material to make cages out of is concrete reinforcing wire. It has about 4" mesh. You can find pieces of rolls at concrete contractors who will sell or give them to you at a bargan. Just roll out enough to make a cage the diameter you want, cut and fasten together. Cut the webs out of the bottom row of wire, leaving the vertical wire in place. This will allow you to push the ends in the ground for stabilityBilly

Re: tomato

Thu Feb 04, 2010 11:52 am

DanR wrote:I read that tomato plants should be planted laying down. Anybody ever do this?

Never tried it, but I suppose it would be easier on the knees.

What I do is similar to what Billy said. I dig down however far is needed to bury most of the plant. Your soil and water conditions may favor one method over the other. You might try some deep and others sideways to see if you notice a difference.

I made cages out of 6" mesh reinforcing wire. They work great but I am too lazy to make any more, so I have supplemented with some of the store-bought supports. They aren't as good.

Re: tomato

Thu Feb 04, 2010 12:24 pm

Heavy duty tomato cages were on the market early last spring. Cost 30 or 35 cents each more than the standard cage. Impressed, didn't fold up (bend) when setting in place. Went back to buy more. Sold out for the year. Pretty impressed with them, they didn't fall over or bend up when the tomato plant reached full size and fruited.

Re: tomato

Thu Feb 04, 2010 1:06 pm

We've been using metal T post fence posts instead of cages. The plants are tied to the post with a special tie meant for use in vineyards that we buy at our local farm supply store. The tie doesn't hurt the plants and makes tomato picking easier because we no longer have to reach into a wire cage to pick the fruit. It's also easier to clean up at the end of the season. Everyone's got their own method. This is an interesting thread.

Ed

Re: tomato

Thu Feb 04, 2010 3:03 pm

I have always done like Billy does but use a handful of triple 10 and a teaspoon of Epsom salts. I met with one of the County Agents this morning and he said The Epsom salts did no good. I should have a surplus of plants this year so I will lay down a few and see what happens.

Re: tomato

Thu Feb 04, 2010 3:05 pm

If I have plants that got too tall, I lay them in a shallow hole,----wind dont tear them up as bad.--I never remove any leaves. but mine are usually only a couple inches tall when I transplant them and I only use my fingers to set them in the ground and top them off with a "cone"(short pieces of plastic tile). this protects them a little from the wind but not from these dang little brown sparrow lookin vultures that we are blessed with here!, also gallon jugs work if you cut just the bottom inch or so off them. thanks; sonny

Re: tomato

Thu Feb 04, 2010 5:22 pm

I like that Idea for concrete wire,Never planted laying down the plant,but will try it this spring :)

Re: tomato

Sun Feb 14, 2010 11:43 am

I have tried many differnt ways over the years.They all work.I throw a little fertilizer and plant deep.Having a good summer with heat and rains seems to be best.Hope we have a great year this year!!!! 3rd year of my garden.This is when it starts producing good!!!! Kevin :shock: :shock: :{_}: :{_}:

Re: tomato

Sun Feb 14, 2010 11:44 am

I just hope the late blight doesn't get us all again. :(

Re: tomato

Sun Feb 14, 2010 1:18 pm

I have always planted my tomatoes laying down. Remove all but the top 2 or 3 leaves then bury the rest in a trench. I developes a larger root system, faster. They can also go without water longer.

Re: tomato

Sun Feb 14, 2010 2:25 pm

Blight hits my tomato plants every august. :(

Re: tomato

Sun Feb 14, 2010 3:42 pm

DanR wrote:I have always done like Billy does but use a handful of triple 10 and a teaspoon of Epsom salts. I met with one of the County Agents this morning and he said The Epsom salts did no good. I should have a surplus of plants this year so I will lay down a few and see what happens.

The epsom salts adds magnesium, to the soil. Its supposed to reduce blossom end rot. Only helps, if the soil is deficient in magnesium. Ed