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Farming and rural life discussion forum. Cooking, hunting, gardening, fishing, critters, etc.
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Sat Sep 16, 2006 5:03 pm

Rudi:

Do not eat the walnuts I'm mailing to you. Plant them. If they turn out like their parent they will be veneer or close to veneer quality in 80 or 100 years.

We can split any profit when you sell the saw logs.

Eugene

Sat Sep 16, 2006 5:40 pm

When I was in college, I had a friend who's brother made a living by rustling walnut trees. :shock:

Sat Sep 16, 2006 5:56 pm

Don: At the price which walnut logs bring he probably retired at an early age with lots of money. Maybe better than the brother who attended college. LOL Dan

Sat Sep 16, 2006 6:34 pm

Don McCombs wrote:I'm not gonna hull 'em for ya Rudi. You can get your own hands black. :D


Not only will I be willing to hull my own walnuts.. I am going to keep the hulls.

Why :?: :?: he asks.. :?: :wink: :arrow: :idea: :idea: Old tyme furniture stains are made from the hulls of walnuts... awesome stuff.. alcohol and walnuts... wow! gonna be nice to work with.. gonna have to see if I can find my Dad's recipe for walnut stain.... :D :D

Sat Sep 16, 2006 7:00 pm

WisconsinCubMan
I don't think anyone answered your question about the walnuts in the stores. Most of the walnuts you see in grocery stores are English Walnuts. Black Walnuts are both a little darker in color, and have a taste that is stronger than the lighter, milder, English Walnut.

Sat Sep 16, 2006 7:35 pm

Knew of a fellow not far from me that was rustleing walnut trees in the wayne national forest here in southern ohio, got caught, done three years in the heart break hotel. Stopped his walnut carear.

Tue Sep 19, 2006 10:14 pm

The two Nut Wizards I ordered arrived today. Tried one out. What a back saver. It only took a couple of minutes to fill a five gallon pail. It even worked in the tall grass outside the mowed area.

Eugene

Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:10 pm

When I worked at the state , there was tell of a tree in Ohio , veneer quailty, that went for around $30,000. However if you are planning on making money on them , you may as well plan for the grand kids maybe even the great grand kids, I saw a bumper sticker that read " 40 ain't old for a tree"

Sat Sep 30, 2006 8:12 pm

There are lots of pine plantations in southern Arkansas. When an area is set in pine seedlings, the plants are set quite close together. This encourages natural pruning of limbs. Occasionally, I see crews of workers doing additional pruning which, I believe, decreases the number of knots in lumber
from the trees. I am wondering whether these practices are used when growing walnut trees for lumber? Dan

Sat Sep 30, 2006 10:48 pm

Dan England wrote:There are lots of pine plantations in southern Arkansas. When an area is set in pine seedlings, the plants are set quite close together. This encourages natural pruning of limbs. Occasionally, I see crews of workers doing additional pruning which, I believe, decreases the number of knots in lumber
from the trees. I am wondering whether these practices are used when growing walnut trees for lumber? Dan


The answer is generally yes. You start out setting the seedlings quite close to gether. Some grow, some die. After a couple of years you thin out the poorly shaped trees. Black walnuts are not self purning to a large extent. You need to prune if you want to lumber the tree. As the trees mature you need to thin out the stand.

The University Extension Office had a course on forestry and forestry management practices. I sent my wife to the course.

Eugene

Sun Oct 01, 2006 11:14 am

I finally took a picture of my valiant little walnut tree. I didn't know the squirrels had planted it until I saw its' crown peeking from the top of an Austrian pine. I've been watching it for a couple years now... it was bare of any branches and straight as a string for maybe 20 feet. Nature gave it the drive to shoot up toward the light.

Now the sad part... while we were at CubFest a severe storm tore it from its' hiding place and laid it across the driveway. Not having the heart to kill it after all its' effort I pulled it aside and tied it in place. Since then a small branch has begun to develop and the crown has turned itself to be upright again. Time will tell whether it will develop into a clear log for making walnut rocking chairs or boomerangs. :D

So the answer is nature will do a pretty good job of pruning while the young tree tries to reach the light.

Image

Wed Oct 04, 2006 6:09 am

I took a gallon glass jar and filled it with mushy walnut hulls and a topped it off with mineral spirits. Let them soak for a couple of months shaking occasionally. Squezzed and strained --- homemade walnut stain. When my oldest son was about 6 I built him a tool box out of some wide pine boards we got out of my wifes Great Aunt and Uncles house that was being torn down. Stained the box with our homed stain. Worked great.

Fri Oct 27, 2006 5:23 am

Those hand-cranked corn shellers (like my A.H. Patch Black Hawk) do an awsome job of hullin' walnuts. :wink: The HARDEST part is CLEANIN' your HANDS and BEATIN' the squirrels to the walnuts :!: :shock:
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