Part of something special

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Lightning rod
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Part of something special

Postby Lightning rod » Sun Jul 19, 2015 8:26 pm

I'm a third generation autoworker. I've spent years assembling cars for a foreign car maker and in the last year I've moved into the quality control side of the business. Now don't get me wrong, we build high quality vehicles. But when I think about the vehicles we build now compared to things like the tractors we talk about in this forum, or the classic cars that fascinated my dad, I get a little sad. I just don't see these cars being a classic part of history. I wonder if the folks that built these machines of the past felt like they were a part of something as special
Everything worth learning, I learned on the farm

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randallc
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Tractors Owned: 1951 Farmall Cub, 152 disk plow, 2 gang disk, belly mower, sickle mower
1949 Farmall Cub, cultivator, moldboard plow, disk,front blade. Cub Cadet, LTX1045 Mower. Cub Cadet's 109, 125, 1000, and 1250
1961 cub c2 belly mower and full blade. 48 cub manual lift with cultivators.
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Re: Part of something special

Postby randallc » Mon Jul 20, 2015 5:02 am

Dad had a red 56 ford pickup back in 62 that I called mine. I loved the truck, put a wax shine on it and thought it was great. In 64 he traded it in on a new 64 Chevy that was a plain jane but very nice truck.
When I look back, I wish we would have kept it, would love to have one now. But at the time, it was nothing real special. Like the Mustangs that came out. Cheap knock around teenager cars. Nothing special, now look at them. So I think back in the day, folks took everything for granted. Same as today.
Guinea, 1951 Farmall Cub; Jumping Willy, 1949 Farmall Cub, 61 Cub, Scrapy, and 48 Cub Al, 48 cub, Billy D.
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Donegal Cub
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Re: Part of something special

Postby Donegal Cub » Mon Jul 20, 2015 6:43 am

Modern cars today far excell the cars of yesteryear in every way. They are much safer, better engineered, less prone to the dreaded rust, much more economical to run, and all round a much,much better product. On the other side of the coin, you need to be an expert to repair them, and are far too complicated for the ordinary back yard mechanic if anything goes wrong, and there are more things on them which can go wrong. However give this old coon the modern car every time :worthy: :worthy: .
Bernard,
Donegal Cub.

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John *.?-!.* cub owner
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Re: Part of something special

Postby John *.?-!.* cub owner » Mon Jul 20, 2015 9:37 am

I am pretty much with you Donegal. I have had some old rigs I really loved, but for comfort and durability I will take a modern vehicle. If you got 60,000 to 80,000 miles out of the old late 50s to late 70s vehicles you figured they were done for. Even less miles for the earlier ones. If a modern vehicle does not make 180,000 to 200,000 we think they are a piece of junk. A modern vehicle in an accident will sustain more damage making it more expensive to repair if even reasonable to repair, but the drivers chances of walking away with minor injuries are 10 times better than they were in the 60s and 70s.
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Bus Driver
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Re: Part of something special

Postby Bus Driver » Wed Jul 22, 2015 7:52 am

In the old days, the life of points and plugs was about 10K maximum. And some internal engine service was usually needed at 70-80K miles, as stated. We have one in our family fleet that has over 200K miles and still goes over 3K miles with oil consumption of 1 quart.
But trying to restore one of those 50 years from now will be frustrating. The electronic and plastic trim parts will be non-existent.
My F-150 just had the plastic end knob to break on the column-mounted shift lever. Requires replacing the entire shift lever.
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Scrivet
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Re: Part of something special

Postby Scrivet » Wed Jul 22, 2015 10:17 pm

Bus Driver wrote:..........
But trying to restore one of those 50 years from now will be frustrating. The electronic and plastic trim parts will be non-existent.
..............
Also nonexistent will be the software and hardware technology to install it. That's changing every couple years so far "usually" backwards compatible. But think about not that many years ago computer inputs were reel to reel magnetic tapes, punch cards, and punch tape. Try booting up your laptop with a punch tape. :shock: :D

Lightning rod
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Re: Part of something special

Postby Lightning rod » Thu Jul 23, 2015 12:03 am

One thing I've learned building cars; once an acquaintance learns that you work at the car plant, they assume that you know how to fix their car. It's kind of an inside joke at the plant. I enjoy the interest people have in the cars I build and I hope that years down the road people will still be just as interested.
Everything worth learning, I learned on the farm

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John *.?-!.* cub owner
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Re: Part of something special

Postby John *.?-!.* cub owner » Thu Jul 23, 2015 10:06 am

Bus Driver wrote:In the old days, the life of points and plugs was about 10K maximum. And some internal engine service was usually needed at 70-80K miles, as stated. ........
Also don't overlook the difference in tire life, both due to the quality of tires and the quality of suspensions now. In the 70s, 10k to 15k on a 4wd and 25k on a standard car was a long life for tires. My son put his first set of tires on his Fiesta at 72K last month. The Ranger I traded in for a new Ranger 3 years ago was on it's second set of tires at 80k. The first set was part of the Firestone recall.
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birddog
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Re: Part of something special

Postby birddog » Fri Jul 24, 2015 9:32 pm

John you're right about the tire life, but the air must have been better in the olden days. :D I bought a pair of recapped snow tires in 1969 and ran them for 4 or five years. When I no longer had a car they fit I put them on the rock pile out back. One day 10 years or so later I decided to check them, one had around 15#s in it and the other in the low 20s. Now days it seems you have to air up one or more tires per vehicle every month or so.
Mark "birddog" Birdeau
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Lightning rod
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Re: Part of something special

Postby Lightning rod » Fri Jul 24, 2015 11:23 pm

My dad passed away a few years back and inheriting his things has been like his last gift to me. Most of his tools and equipment I remember using as a kid. Who knows how long they were around before me. I would rather work on these old things than own new ones. My wife doesn't understand this. I tell her it's not junk if it just needs new parts
Everything worth learning, I learned on the farm


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