Re: shop

Sat Nov 19, 2011 10:16 am

Good information on concrete/cement, costs, etc. I want to get the floor of my 100+ yr. barn poured. I would like to do it myself to save money but then again I'm nervous about a truck pulling up and dumping me more of a job than I can handle, and/or there are skills about working the concrete that I don't have.
Maybe someone could give some basic "this is how you work concrete" for a job like a shop floor, etc.

I havn't watched anyone work concrete since I was a kid. I did get to see a big form that was going to be a fixed equipment pad, probably 16" thick, blow out while it was being poured, what a mess. The job quickly passed the point of no return, the workers had to take loader buckets of concrete out back and dump it. But that's a different kind of job than floors, etc.


Thackery

Re: shop

Sat Nov 19, 2011 12:53 pm

Doug,

Here's my personal opinion...

Installing concrete, in any form, is back-breaking work. Once you start, you're in it until it's completely done. Unless you have a bunch of experienced friends, who are willing to help you, I feel that a project of that size is best left to the professionals.

Re: shop

Sat Nov 19, 2011 1:14 pm

Thackery wrote:Good information on concrete/cement, costs, etc. I want to get the floor of my 100+ yr. barn poured. I would like to do it myself to save money but then again I'm nervous about a truck pulling up and dumping me more of a job than I can handle, and/or there are skills about working the concrete that I don't have.
Maybe someone could give some basic "this is how you work concrete" for a job like a shop floor, etc.

I havn't watched anyone work concrete since I was a kid. I did get to see a big form that was going to be a fixed equipment pad, probably 16" thick, blow out while it was being poured, what a mess. The job quickly passed the point of no return, the workers had to take loader buckets of concrete out back and dump it. But that's a different kind of job than floors, etc.


Thackery

I have to agree with Don, on this one. I had my shop floor done, professionally, and I'm as cheap as they come. I do respect my old back bone, and hope to get a few more years out of it. Ed

Re: shop

Sat Nov 19, 2011 4:11 pm

Good advice from all of you. Now I have to decide which I will pour and if this old man can handle it on a DIY project. Cement yes, concrete however might be a bit much. :bellylaugh: :bellylaugh: :applause: :bellylaugh:

Thanks for all your input, it gave me more to consider before starting anything.

Reg

Re: shop

Sat Nov 19, 2011 6:11 pm

Reg:

All of my training in architectural design and of course my experience of the years as a contractor dictates that a slab has to be on a well drained undisturbed soil site with a good bed of 0"-3/4" crushed rock and re-enforced with either re-bar or re-enforcing wire mesh. If not then frost heaves will crack the floor. Ask me.. I cut corners years ago on my shop floor and omitted the re-enforcing wire mesh and my floor has literally broken up. Re-enforced concrete floors are a must. It only adds a couple hundred to the cost if you buy new mesh and substantially less if you use recycled products.

As Billy said if your a pouring a slab, then I would simply remove the overburden - aka - top soil and backfill with drainage material such as the crushed rock and build up the drainage so that it is higher than the surrounding grade. Tamp the crushed rock with a portable plate tamper inside the forms and then have at it.

Setting the foundation base and the forms is something you can do yourself, take your time, research it --- Reader's Digest Back To Basics has a good section on exactly this subject and is worth looking into or similar articles. You can even pour the floor yourself and screed the concrete as well. However I would definitely suggest that you hire a good concrete finisher who will not only float the floor but if control joints are needed, can do the job properly and economically.

Re: shop

Sat Nov 19, 2011 6:43 pm

Rudy, Thanks. I am serching and asking questions at the same time. I will soon be ready to start and all the input here will be useful.
Reg

Re: shop

Sun Nov 20, 2011 10:06 pm

The monolithic portions should be at least 12 inches below existing grade,be at least 12 inches wide at the base, and should have at least 2 #4 rebars in the lower 1/3 of the footing sections. You also need 1/2 inch "j" hook bolts ( hot dipped galvanized) with 7 inches of embedment in the concrete. The bolts need to be within 12" of each corner and joint in the bottom plate, and every 6 feet linear. The bottom plate should be treated yellow pine. If you dont have a good basic foundation, the rest of the building is irrelevant. If you have alot of slope on the site, I would recommend a stemwall slab.

Re: shop

Mon Nov 21, 2011 8:53 am

Don't remember the exact cost but I built a 32 X 60 and the concrete/cement floor cost more than the rest of the barn.

Re: shop

Mon Nov 21, 2011 10:57 am

You can figure if the cement is $1500 the labor will be that much too to have it floated and formed up