And you thought getting a cub stuck in the mud was bad!

Sat Dec 25, 2004 7:02 pm

from redpowermagazine.com

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Sat Dec 25, 2004 7:08 pm

don't think that was easy to do or get out.

Bill

Sat Dec 25, 2004 8:53 pm

Dag, what a mess. How do you get into that..much less get out of it?

Sat Dec 25, 2004 9:19 pm

It wasn't stated in the thread, but by the looks of the ground and the slabs if ice I suspect he was either trying to do something with a low spot, or cleaning a pond.

Sun Dec 26, 2004 5:37 am

I was wondering from the stubble growth if it could have been a Rice field?

Bill

Sun Dec 26, 2004 10:24 am

Possile, but the ground looks pretty rolling for rice, plus rice doesn't usually grow well anyplace that gets cold enough to have that much ice.

Sun Dec 26, 2004 1:40 pm

Thanks John. So much for my idea of rice.

Bill

Re: And you thought getting a cub stuck in the mud was bad!

Sat Jan 01, 2005 9:00 pm

John *.?-!.* cub owner wrote:from redpowermagazine.com

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I haven't seen anything like that since a certain construction forman managed to stick his whole spread of equipment in approximately 4' deep muck land that had 6" of frost on top off rte # 49 where rte I -95 was built back in year 1963. The spread consisted of 2-D8 dozers, a frost ripper 2 21cy scrapers, 2-tandem dump trucks, a rough terrain cane, and a Bucyrus Erie 77 with a shovel front that was being assembled at the time. After the shovel was assembled the had to dig their way into the stuck equipment to get to it, lost time approximatly 3 weeks.

Fri Jan 21, 2005 8:39 pm

somebody was a little over-confident...

"nah... we can make it across that ice, at least i can.. can u?!"

thats gonna me a pain to clean... let alone get it out.

Fri Jan 21, 2005 9:10 pm

beaconlight wrote:Thanks John. So much for my idea of rice.Bill
Rice requires extremely level ground for the flooding to be effective. Usually it's leveled to within 4 inches between levies. It also requires a lot of warm weather. They tried it in central Mo., but it didn't work out. Central Arkansas is about as far north as I seen it grown effectively.