Mon Oct 03, 2005 6:34 am

Eugene wrote:How about a photo. I keep thinking one of the paddle chain elevators - I've never seen one with wood. Or, is this a hay buck?

Eugene


I think he is talking about something like this:
Image

Ike

Mon Oct 03, 2005 11:05 am

Ike:

That is what was called a hay buck in central Iowa. I haven't seen one of those used since the early 50s.

Those things used a lot of man power (pitch fork work) to put hay into the barn.

Eugene

Mon Oct 03, 2005 1:01 pm

Ike,

That's exactly the loader I was thinking of. We made a lot of loose hay with one behind a horse drawn wagon. The team of horses also pulled the mower and rake... and then pulled the bull rope to pull the slings of hay up into the barn. No tractor at all was used for hay making.

The cross pieces are wood... probably oak, running between the link chains on both sides. there are ropes running parallel to the chains through holes in the slats... about 8" on centers. The hay rides on the slats and ropes, and is protected from loss by wind by additional lengthwise slats that ride on top of the hay.

It's been a long time, but if I recall correctly most of the metal was painted yellow, even though it was a McCormick machine (I think).

Mon Oct 03, 2005 3:11 pm

i will post a pic in a few minutes if I can remember how to post a pic? It look kind of like that on but a little different, rough looking for sitting outside for who knows how many years.

Mon Oct 03, 2005 3:52 pm

Let's see if this worked, [ img]http://photos.cubfest.com/displayimage.php?album=random&cat=10037&pos=-505[/img]

Mon Oct 03, 2005 3:53 pm

Don't remember how to post a pic but I will post the url to the pics. http://photos.cubfest.com/index.php?cat=10037

Mon Oct 03, 2005 4:07 pm

here ya go!



Image

Image

Mon Oct 03, 2005 4:18 pm

Thanks BD, I can't quite get the picture thing right, looks like you can 8) thanks again. I think that its really old because I have the 150 Years of IH and I can't find one exactly like it, does anybody know if the double drums on the back were an option? that's the only difference in the pics. Thanks again BigDog, Johnny

Mon Oct 03, 2005 6:34 pm

George Willer wrote:Ike,

That's exactly the loader I was thinking of. We made a lot of loose hay with one behind a horse drawn wagon. The team of horses also pulled the mower and rake... and then pulled the bull rope to pull the slings of hay up into the barn. No tractor at all was used for hay making.

The cross pieces are wood... probably oak, running between the link chains on both sides. there are ropes running parallel to the chains through holes in the slats... about 8" on centers. The hay rides on the slats and ropes, and is protected from loss by wind by additional lengthwise slats that ride on top of the hay.

It's been a long time, but if I recall correctly most of the metal was painted yellow, even though it was a McCormick machine (I think).


I thought that was it. I have never used one, but there were still some sitting around in Western Ohio when I was a kid. Pop explained what they were and how they were used. We did use a loose hay grapple fork to put baled hay in the mow 6 bales at a time. We used a tractor on the rope. I got to drive by default since I was the youngest and not as much help in the mow. Moving 3 or 4 hundred bales took a lot of trips across the barnyard, but I didn't complain. :D

Ike

Tue Oct 04, 2005 6:18 am

One of my family's stories is about the time the team of horses stepped into a yellow jacket's nest and ran away pulling the wagon and hay loader.
"It shot hay clear over the wagon and onto the horses."
I still have a New Idea loader. I've thought of fixing it up, but I don't know what for. It's too big for yard art.
Best,
Mike