How To Build a Large Backyard Parts Cleaner

Easy ways to clean parts, remove broken bolts, etc.

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How To Build a Large Backyard Parts Cleaner

Postby Eugene » Tue Feb 20, 2007 9:59 pm

Finding a powered Parts Cleaner large enough to accomodate some of the rather large castings that form a Farmall or IH Cub can be quite daunting, if not impossible for most. Even if cost were not an impediment, this would still be difficult. The easiest and cheapest solution is to make one :!: :idea: :D

    Bill of Materials:

    1. 1 ea. 55 gallon plastic barrel. Thick wall.
    2. Commercial storage rack leg
    3. 4 ea. 5 or 7 gallon plastic pails
    4. 7 feet of plastic hose 5/8” ID
    5. 12 volt Electric fuel pump
    6. 2 ea. battery clips. One red clip and one black clip
    7. Elect wire, 14 gauge. about 8 feet
    8. 12 volt battery
    9. 5/16 dia fuel line hose – about 8 feet
    10. Scrap lumber
    11. Misc nut, bolts and screws
    12. Window screen , about 1 sq ft.
    13. Solvent, kerosene or diesel fuel – about 12 gallon
    Method:
    Barrel: My total cost for items specifically purchased for this parts washer was $15.00, the plastic barrel. The plastic barrel was cut in half length wise. One half of the barrel forms the wash basin. The second half forms a catch basin for spills.

    Image

    Frame: The parts washer frame is constructed from a bent, discarded, storage rack leg. The rack leg was cut down and welded to fit the dimensions of the barrel. Other materials could be used to construct the frame. The only special note is that two braces/supports were placed, the length of the washer, under the wash basin to support the weight. These braces are about 6 to 8 inches apart.

    Image

    Wash Basin: The wash basin is attached (bolted) to the frame, along the top edge, to keep it from moving. A ½ inch diameter drain hole was drilled in one of the barrels ribs on the bottom of the wash basin. The bottom of the rib functions as a drip edge.

    Image

    Catch Basin: The catch basin is not fastened to the frame. The catch basin sets between the frames cross members. A rectangular piece of plywood is bolted to one end of the catch basin. The plywood keeps the catch basin from rolling/upright. The plywood is the height and length of the barrel half. Two bolts in the top of the barrel half secure the plywood to the barrel half.

    Image

    Filter Bucket: The bottom portion of the fourth pail in the materials list, is fabricated into a home-made filter. This filter which sits between the Wash Basin and the Catch Basin is used to catch large pieces of debris. To make the Filter Bucket, about 4 inches of the bottom is cut off. The top portion of this bucket is surplus to the project. A number of holes are then drilled in the bottom of the bucket. Window Screen is in-laid to cover the bottom of the bucket over the holes. Drill 3 or 4 holes around the top perimiter of the filter bucket to accomodate the bolts which will act as the support sytem as the filter bucket rests on the 1st pail under the drain hole in the wash basin.


    Settling Basins: Three plastic pails are used to hold the solvent (kerosene) and function as Settling Basins for the solvent. You can see the Filter Bucket as it is moved into place in the 1st Settling Basin.

    Image

    Siphon System: Set three plastic pails in the catch basin. In the following picture, copper pipe was used for the Siphon System, but may be substituted for 5/8" or 3/4" Rubber Hose which will work better. The large diameter hose (2 sections) are used to siphon solvent from pail to pail. To start the siphon action, first fill the 3 pails about ½ full of solvent. Fill the hose with solvent – no air bubbles. Block off each end of the hose (finger), submerse one end of the hose in the first pail and submerse the opposite end in the second pail. Repeat from the second pail to the third. If done correctly the siphon action will start. The trick is not to release either end of the hose until both ends are submersed.

    Image

    Solvent Pump: The solvent pump is a salvaged 12 volt electric fuel pump. Fuel line hose is attached to the pumps outlet. Electrical wire with battery clips are crimp connected to the pumps two terminals. The pump is suspended with a piece of wire in the last pail, furthest from the drain hole in the wash basin.

    Image

    Power Sources:
    1. Battery: Used 12 volt battery. Not quite good enough to start a vehicle in winter. 12 volt battery charger.
    2. Computer Power Supply: As an alternative, a used Power Supply from a used or junked computer will work equally as well.
I have an excuse. CRS.
Eugene
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