PTO pilot bushing R&R

Anything pertaining to these components will be found here.

Moderators: Barnyard, Team Cub

PTO pilot bushing R&R

Postby Rick Prentice » Fri Jun 08, 2007 8:57 pm

Hello. I decided to tackle a pto pilot bushing tonight. It just so happened that I had an old '51 cub out on the driveway and the back cover was already off. I found my camera and took this pic to get an idea of the access to the back of the trans main shaft. I couldn't believe it, a straight shot at the pilot bushing. I put the tranny in gear so the shaft wouldn't turn. Here's a pic of the inside. Sorry for the bad focus,
Image

I remembered Bigdog talking about using a 7/16"bolt. I found one that had about 1 1/2" of thread on the end, enough to reach all the way in and bottom out once it was through the bushing. This bolt was about 4" long total. The head of the bolt was 5/8". I used a long 3/8" extension with a 5/8" socket and slowly forced the bolt into the old, worn out bushing. It went hard at first, but then started to screw into the bushing just fine. Once it went all the way into the bushing, I could feel the bolt hit the main shaft, then you could feel the bushing coming out. It only came out so far, then I removed my extension and socket, and grabbed a big pair of channel lock pliers and reached in, grabbed the bolt and pulled it out. Here's a pic of it removed.
Image

I had a new bushing on hand. My fat hands wouldn't reach in and place the new bushing into the hole. Instead of making a driver tool in the lathe, I decided to find something that the regular tinkerer person would have laying around. A 3/8 bolt about 2 1/2" long worked perfect. It slid into the new bushing like it was made for it. I then found a 3/8 nut and screwed it onto the bolt all the way. The nut acted as the driver while tapping the bushing back into the hole, plus I was able to use my extension with a 9/16 socket, this time, that fit the 3/8bolt. It allowed me to reach in and place the bushing against the hole and gently tap it in. Once it started to go, it went in perfect all the way till the nut bottomed out. This put the bushing right where it needed to be. Here's a pic of the 3/8 bolt and nut acting as a driver.

Image

And a pic of the new bushing. They're not very expensive, under $5.00
Image

Here's the finished results ready for the pto shaft.
Image

This may not work for every cub out there, but it sure worked slick for just grabbing the first cub that happened to be handy.

Hope it works for you.

The BIGDOG knows his stuff :D :D

Rick
When I told my dad I've been misplacing things and doing stupid stuff----His reply---"It only gets better"
User avatar
Rick Prentice
Team Cub Guide
Team Cub Guide
 
Posts: 5359
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2004 7:24 am
Location: OH, Grand Rapids (historical town along the Maumee River)
Zip Code: 43522
Tractors Owned: 47(circle cub),48(Floyd),49,50demo from GW's collection),51,52(backhoe),53,54,55(Nickles)
Circle of Safety Award
Circle of Safety: Y

Postby Pete1941 » Sat Jun 09, 2007 6:12 am

Rick, Great how to!! That's simple enough that even I can understand it!!!Now, one question, if you remember a while back in my post of culprit in the tranny, some of the guys thought that the piece of bolt/set screw came from the PTO collar. Is that set screw visible in your pic? Pete
Pete1941
5+ Years
5+ Years
 

Postby Don McCombs » Sat Jun 09, 2007 7:21 am

Pete,

The set screw we were referring to is not shown in any of Rick's photos because the entire PTO assembly is pulled out of the transmission case. It is visible in this photo, however.

Image
Don McCombs
MD, Deep Creek Lake

"1950 Something" Farmall Cub
1977 International Cub w/FH
1978 International Cub
1948 Farmall Super A
1951 Farmall Super C w/FH
User avatar
Don McCombs
Team Cub Mentor
Team Cub Mentor
 
Posts: 10541
Joined: Mon Feb 03, 2003 6:45 am
Location: MD, Deep Creek Lake
Zip Code: 21550
Tractors Owned: "1950 Something" Farmall Cub
1977 International Cub w/FH
1978 International Cub
1948 Farmall Super A
1951 Farmall Super C w/FH
Circle of Safety Award
Circle of Safety: Y

Postby Pete1941 » Sat Jun 09, 2007 6:21 pm

Thanks Don, I don't know if that is what I found or not but guess it doesn't matter cause everything is doing fine now. Pete
Pete1941
5+ Years
5+ Years
 

Re: PTO pilot bushing R&R

Postby Earl Dog » Mon Jul 09, 2012 1:22 pm

THANK YOU! This information worked perfectly. I really liked your use of common bolts a guy has laying around. Pilot bushing repair took no time based on your help. Never would have been able to do it otherwise.
Earl Dog
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Jul 09, 2012 12:51 pm
Zip Code: 54017


Return to Differential, Final Drive, PTO and Brakes

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests