Gib keys

Wed Sep 26, 2012 1:13 pm

I saw a reference in another thread about gib keys. The company I work for, continues to use many of these devices to attach sprockets, pulleys, and etc. (I thought they were antiquated when I went to work for them in 1982) After removing & installing hundreds over the past 30 years, and conducting service training sessions to many dealers, I do not object to them at all. It all has to do with the "fit" and whether the guy that installed it the first time knew what he was doing. (make every effort to save the original key, as the replacement will need to be "fitted") The worse thing is when someone deforms the key while attempting to seat it. If it doesn't go into the sprocket or pulley far enough, you get out a file, not a bigger hammer. It does take a bit of time to fit it correctly, but they won't fall out, and will be able to be removed.
Maybe that could be my contribution for a Cubfest sometime???

Re: Gib keys

Wed Sep 26, 2012 2:11 pm

Stan, I had to google to see what a gib key was. Where on the Cub would you propose to use one?

Bob

Re: Gib keys

Wed Sep 26, 2012 2:25 pm

Was thinking that I saw some implements with gib keys on display recently. I know the combine had some. Maybe there's not much interest or need at this time.

Re: Gib keys

Wed Sep 26, 2012 4:15 pm

I had seen them in equipment, but never knew what they were called, thanks.
Image

Re: Gib keys

Thu Sep 27, 2012 7:20 am

That's the baby. Far better than a set screw on a parallel key in my opinion. (the broached slot in the hub is also tapered, so you can't switch back and forth)

Re: Gib keys

Thu Sep 27, 2012 8:57 am

I cant cut and paste this but the name of the company Standard Horse Nail Company and the ad give details of Gib keys.

http://www.stanho.com/products/gib.php

Re: Gib keys

Thu Sep 27, 2012 4:55 pm

We used them as original keys for pinion gears on press drive shafts. If ear broke off on removal we would drill and tap key and use Hyd. puller to pull key out.
Bill

Re: Gib keys

Thu Sep 27, 2012 10:40 pm

Here is a home made Gib Key puller. It looks as if it would work rather well.

http://gasengine.farmcollector.com/gas- ... uller.aspx

Re: Gib keys

Fri Sep 28, 2012 5:32 am

sdurnal wrote:Was thinking that I saw some implements with gib keys on display recently. I know the combine had some. Maybe there's not much interest or need at this time.



52R Combine has several. You have to remove them to swap pulleys to slow the cylinder down for soybeans, or speed it back up for wheat. Never seriously tried to remove one, but I can easily see they were designed by the same demon in he** that came up with the metric system. I don't doubt they have their place but there was no reason IH couldn't have used a square key and a setscrew on the pulley to make it easier to change them. If I had ready access to a lathe & mill, I would re-engineer my combine to do just that.

Al

Re: Gib keys

Fri Sep 28, 2012 7:08 am

Hehe, We'll have to "agree to disagree" about that Al. I much prefer a gib key to a rounded, rusted set screw, and 8mm to 0.315". (I work with both)
Regards,

Re: Gib keys

Fri Sep 28, 2012 7:14 am

Al:

The Metric System is probably the simplest system in the world to use. Like all things that are little difficult to get used to, it was invented a long time ago when the earth was green, not by the Irish but by the French. -- Metric System

The United States is the only industrialized country that does not use the metric system as its official system of measurement, although the metric system has been officially sanctioned for use there since 1866.


Canada had introduced the metric system in the early 70's and although it is taught in schools, the Imperial (English) system of measurements are still part of the mainstream use. Up here we actually have to have 3 separate different systems, Imperial, Metric and US. :roll: And you think it is confusing :lol:

Re: Gib keys

Fri Sep 28, 2012 7:24 am

It doesn't happen too often, but this time I have to agree with Rudi. :lol: I wish the U.S. would completely change over to the metric system. It would take a whole new generation to get used to it, but it is much simpler to deal with.

Re: Gib keys

Fri Sep 28, 2012 8:30 am

I have to admit I also had to Google Gib Key when Stan first posted, just another learning resource this forum provides!

I recall in grade school in the mid 70's we were told we would be on the metric system by the time we graduated high school :wink: ..... (Yes I did graduate :D )

Thanks guys,

Re: Gib keys

Fri Sep 28, 2012 8:49 am

Rudi wrote:Al:

The Metric System is probably the simplest system in the world to use. Like all things that are little difficult to get used to, it was invented a long time ago when the earth was green, not by the Irish but by the French. -- Metric System

The United States is the only industrialized country that does not use the metric system as its official system of measurement, although the metric system has been officially sanctioned for use there since 1866.


Canada had introduced the metric system in the early 70's and although it is taught in schools, the Imperial (English) system of measurements are still part of the mainstream use. Up here we actually have to have 3 separate different systems, Imperial, Metric and US. :roll: And you think it is confusing :lol:



I had the metric system forced on me in high school chemistry. Mathmatically easier, but not easier in practical terms when you know the US (correct) system. Two pints in a quart, four quarts in a gallon, 12 inches in a foot, etc. Any idiot can remember that! The fact that it was invented by the french makes it that much more suspect.... :big smile:

That said, I would love to see the correct way to get them out. On my 60 year old combine the only way I see is lots of heat and even more cussing. Maybe heat the pulley hub and try to tap it further onto the shaft, thereby releasing the key? Would love to try some soybeans with my combine but with the cylinder at wheat threshing speed it'll just grind them....

Al

Re: Gib keys

Fri Sep 28, 2012 1:12 pm

I worked on Japanese and German bikes, so metric is no big deal.
I heard that the US was on the verge of changing the road sign during the Carter administration, but public outcry stopped the change.
I have heard the signs are still in a whare house somewhere.
Last edited by Rudi on Fri Sep 28, 2012 9:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: wording