It is odd.....

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It is odd.....

Postby Colin » Thu Jun 15, 2006 11:45 pm

I have a general idea of how the process of preparing a field goes. Over a bit of time I have gotten a plow, discs, and just recently a cultivator for my cub. I know the basic idea of what each does and how they work. I however still do not know the real details for each impliment. But if anyone could tell me a bit of how to properly prepair a feild, or tell me where to find this information, that would help me understand my pile of impliments a bit more. :D
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Postby cowboy » Fri Jun 16, 2006 6:59 am

Hi Colin

Plowing loosens up the soil. Turning it over taking orginac material down into the soil improveing soil quality, its abilty to hold and drain water and keeps it loser and easier for new root systems to grow. Also plowing rips up old root systems helping kill off old root systems killing off weeds etc.

After years of plowing you end up with a hard pacted layer under the bottom of the plowing depth which is where subsoilers come into play to loosen up the soil to a much deeper depth.

Disks, drag harrows, spring tooth harrows are all ways to break up the clumps from plowing smooth out the field. Also they can be used before planting to run over the field and rip up and kill off weeds.

Cultivators are used in row planted crops to work up and kill off weed between the rows of crops.


Well I finaly got the other pasture put up and my horse moved. I have to mow the pasture once agin. And spray it to kill all the weeds. After I spray it it will be about two weeks untill we can plow. And we willl need some rain right now this clay is hard as a rock and I do not think a plow will pull through it.

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Postby Colin » Fri Jun 16, 2006 8:48 am

Exactly what I was looking for. Thank you Cowboy, I can wait to try all this stuff out :P
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Postby Eugene » Fri Jun 16, 2006 9:13 am

Your local county extension office, US Department of Agriculture offices and perhaps state conservation offices will have a great deal of information on crops and soil preparation. Several of these offices will visit your property and provide helpful suggestions.

You didn't indicate how many acres of land are involved. Talk to neighboring farmers. They will be most helpful. You need to find out the cost of planting and harvesting various types of crops - and equipment needed. You may find out that you can not afford to plant and harvest some crops. Or that your ground is not suitable for a particular crop.

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Postby Colin » Fri Jun 16, 2006 3:53 pm

Eugene, I have to admit I have NO land. Im just a city kid whos interest was sparked by a tractor. I have it and all the impliments just because they are a fun to work with and provide a good learning experence. I also have a small hope that one day I will be able to use my tractor and its' impliments in their natural enviroment :D. But for now I just clean them up and get them working, just in case that one day comes :lol:. It is still fun to roll aroud the city streets with a tractor, I get the weirdest looks. But that is the main reason I know little about what each impliment is exactly for, the largest farm within an hour of me is 2 tomato plants and a few cucumbers.:roll:
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Postby Eugene » Fri Jun 16, 2006 6:11 pm

Colin:

Visit your local library. Look for books of farming and farm machinery.

Also visit the government offices I previously suggested.

There are youth organizations dealing with agriculture. Example 4H and FFA.

Do you have insurance for driving the tractor on public streets? And do you have the SMV sign?

Old tractors is a great hobby. Best wishes.

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Postby Colin » Fri Jun 16, 2006 9:11 pm

No, I don't have any insurance, however I got every sign I need to make it perfectly street legal. :D
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Postby Jackman » Fri Jun 16, 2006 10:09 pm

Cowboy wrote:Hi Colin

Plowing loosens up the soil. Turning it over taking orginac material down into the soil improveing soil quality, its abilty to hold and drain water and keeps it loser and easier for new root systems to grow. Also plowing rips up old root systems helping kill off old root systems killing off weeds etc.

After years of plowing you end up with a hard pacted layer under the bottom of the plowing depth which is where subsoilers come into play to loosen up the soil to a much deeper depth.

Disks, drag harrows, spring tooth harrows are all ways to break up the clumps from plowing smooth out the field. Also they can be used before planting to run over the field and rip up and kill off weeds.

Cultivators are used in row planted crops to work up and kill off weed between the rows of crops.


Well I finaly got the other pasture put up and my horse moved. I have to mow the pasture once agin. And spray it to kill all the weeds. After I spray it it will be about two weeks untill we can plow. And we willl need some rain right now this clay is hard as a rock and I do not think a plow will pull through it.

Billy


Hey Cownboy ,

Thats some intresting info for us nonfarmer's Thanks for posting it, I was wondering if you could discribe what a subdsoiler looks like? In my town there is a farm , its a very large corn farm and I some times see them with there big John Deere's with a large 3 pt attachment tyhat has a large 3-4 foot spike or chisel looking thing any way they put that spike totally in the ground and then run around the perimeter of there fields, I often wonder what thats supposed to do since it doesnt seem to do much to the surface of the soil, but I know that point is down deep, so I am guessing its a subsoiler.


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Postby evielboweviel » Sat Jun 17, 2006 7:18 am

you are guessing right. anything that gets below the plow pan is a subsoiler. the ones that are in use now are very big and go real deep even one that goes 12-14" deep used on ground that was plowed at 7" deep will help a lot. a cub probably could pull one point in first gear may have to make multiple passes to get full depth. also people use them when running a trench to loosen the grond for digging
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Postby Bigdog » Sat Jun 17, 2006 10:58 am

Colin - If you can attend CubFest next week-end (June 23 - 25) it would be an excellent time for you to see some cubs and their implements in action. You could even bring your own to see how it does. But if you don't want to bring your own tractor you should at least drive down and visit with us and I guarantee that my tractors and surely some others will be available for you to play on. Come and turn over some dirt with the rest of us. There will be some plowing, disking and maybe even some planting.
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