leaded or not gas

Farmall Cub Forum -- Questions and answers to all of your Cub related issues.

Moderator: Team Cub

Forum rules
Notice: For sale and wanted posts are not allowed in this forum. Please use our free classifieds or one of our site sponsors for your tractor and parts needs.

leaded or not gas

Postby tughillbill » Mon Nov 27, 2006 7:20 pm

reading all the interesting oil change'stuff',i have a ??does anyone add lead substitute to 'unleaded gas??have been doing that in the last few yrs.,but am out of the''lead''..is it a moot point?an old timer told me unleaded burns hotter..p.s.i love this forum thanks...
tughillbill
5+ Years
5+ Years
 
Posts: 23
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2005 6:01 pm
Location: SIDNEY,N.Y.

Postby Bigdog » Mon Nov 27, 2006 7:22 pm

I believe there are a few who do but I do not and I think most do not. Modern day additives make it un-necessary.
Bigdog
If you can't fix it with a hammer, you've got an electrical problem.

My wife says I don't listen to her. - - - - - - - - Or something like that!

http://www.cubtug.com
User avatar
Bigdog
Team Cub
Team Cub
 
Posts: 23820
Joined: Sun Feb 02, 2003 12:50 pm
Location: OH, Stoutsville
Zip Code: 43154
Circle of Safety Award
Circle of Safety: Y

Postby Bus Driver » Mon Nov 27, 2006 8:17 pm

Additives provide benefits for those who make and sell them. Unless a specific short-term problem is identified that could be helped by a one-time use of a specific additive, I consider them to be absolutely unnecessary.
Luck favors those who are prepared
User avatar
Bus Driver
Team Cub Mentor
Team Cub Mentor
 
Posts: 2650
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2006 5:26 pm
Location: NC

Postby John *.?-!.* cub owner » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:34 pm

I believe BD was referring to the adititves put in by fuel manufacturers, not after market ones.
"The Constitution is not an instrument for the government
to restrain the people, it is an instrument for the people to restrain the
government lest it come to dominate our lives and interests." Patrick Henry
User avatar
John *.?-!.* cub owner
Team Cub Guide
Team Cub Guide
 
Posts: 19471
Joined: Sun Feb 02, 2003 2:09 pm
Location: Mo, Potosi
Zip Code: 63664
Tractors Owned: 47, 48, 49 cub plus Wagner loader & other attachments. 41 Farmall H.

Postby Bigdog » Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:36 pm

And you would be correct! :D
Bigdog
If you can't fix it with a hammer, you've got an electrical problem.

My wife says I don't listen to her. - - - - - - - - Or something like that!

http://www.cubtug.com
User avatar
Bigdog
Team Cub
Team Cub
 
Posts: 23820
Joined: Sun Feb 02, 2003 12:50 pm
Location: OH, Stoutsville
Zip Code: 43154
Circle of Safety Award
Circle of Safety: Y

Postby Lurker Carl » Mon Nov 27, 2006 10:05 pm

The Cub was designed to run on 80 octane gasoline, that's the original unleaded stuff. Compression isn't high enough to warrent using lead or lead substitutes because the low compression engines aren't prone to detonation.

Unleaded gas doesn't run hotter, the new engines that must use unleaded have a leaner air to fuel ratio that makes the combustion temperatures hotter. Detroit had to make the exhaust valves and seats harder to resist the hotter exhaust temperatures, thus creating the myth that unleaded gas burns hotter and lead is a valve lubricant.
"Chance favors the prepared mind."
- Louis Pasteur

"In character, in manners, in style, in all things, the supreme excellence is simplicity."
- Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
User avatar
Lurker Carl
Team Cub Mentor
Team Cub Mentor
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Feb 03, 2003 9:54 am
Location: PA, Todd
Zip Code: 16685
Circle of Safety Award
Circle of Safety: Y

Postby Rudi » Mon Nov 27, 2006 10:20 pm

Lurker Carl wrote:The Cub was designed to run on 80 octane gasoline, that's the original unleaded stuff. Compression isn't high enough to warrent using lead or lead substitutes because the low compression engines aren't prone to detonation.

Unleaded gas doesn't run hotter, the new engines that must use unleaded have a leaner air to fuel ratio that makes the combustion temperatures hotter. Detroit had to make the exhaust valves and seats harder to resist the hotter exhaust temperatures, thus creating the myth that unleaded gas burns hotter and lead is a valve lubricant.


Cool, Carl.. and here I was thinking :oops: :idea: :wink: :D .. additives were just another way for the oil companies to take more of our cash... sheeesh.. shame on me huh :roll: :oops: :roll: :oops: :roll: :!: Image
Confusion breeds Discussion which breeds Knowledge which breeds Confidence which breeds Friendship

User avatar
Rudi
Team Cub
Team Cub
 
Posts: 28471
Joined: Sun Feb 02, 2003 8:37 pm
Location: NB Dieppe, Canada
Zip Code: E1A7J3
eBay ID: ve9rhs
Skype Name: R.H. "Rudi" Saueracker, SSM
Tractors Owned: 1947 Cub "Granny"
1948 Cub "Ellie-Mae"
1951 Cub "Jethro"
Dad's Putt-Putt
IH 129 CC
Circle of Safety Award
Circle of Safety: Y
Twitter ID: Rudi Saueracker, SSM

Postby BigBill » Mon Nov 27, 2006 10:31 pm

I run high test (92) in all my power equipment. I also use two stroke chainsaw oil in my 4 stroke engines on all my power equipment too. Just a little will do. Its the same as using an upper lube for the valves.

I built my own log splitter using the cheapest 8hp briggs motor aluminum cast cylinder. The dealer told me it wouldn't last one year. It lasted over 20 years by adding the two stroke gas to it every once in a while. The motor is on a second splitter still running wide open today with its second owner. I know when i see the blue colored gas in the fuel bowel its right. Just a little will do so you don't foul the plugs.

This newer gas is raising hell with the older fuel lines too. The gas hoses melted on my older husky chainsaws and they had to be replaced. The dealer is my buddy and he said its the new gas thats the problem with the older rubber hoses.
I'm technically misunderstood at times i guess its been this way my whole life so why should it change now.
BigBill
5+ Years
5+ Years
 
Posts: 5705
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2006 5:02 pm
Location: in northern usa
Zip Code: 00000

Postby Matt Kirsch » Tue Nov 28, 2006 8:53 am

BigBill,

You're wasting your money on "hi-test" gas. It's of no better quality than regular, and octane is not a replacement for lead. In fact, the octane does nothing for low-compression engines like that 8HP Brigges, or the ones on our Cubs... Hi-test gas is only necessary in some high-compression, high-performance engines in expensive cars.
Matt Kirsch
10+ Years
10+ Years
 
Posts: 3348
Joined: Tue Jun 08, 2004 3:04 pm
Location: Rochester, NY
Zip Code: 14559
Circle of Safety Award
Circle of Safety: Y

Postby Brandon Webb » Tue Nov 28, 2006 9:00 am

I never really understood octane, my Camaro SS says to run premium, I always run the 87 octane. When you get on it the valves rattle, if you run the good gas in it, it doesn't do it. Cheap gas makes you think you need to adjust the valves. Why is that? I can understand needing it for the higher compression but why do the valves rattle? :D Brandon
User avatar
Brandon Webb
5+ Years
5+ Years
 
Posts: 2156
Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2005 4:32 pm
Location: London, Kentucky
Zip Code: 40741
Tractors Owned: 1947 Farmall Cub #1024
1957 Farmall Cub High Crop
1975 International Cub
1977 International Cub
1978 International Cub

Postby tughillbill » Tue Nov 28, 2006 9:09 am

thanks all,its just a matter of opinion,so i'll keep it simple..just was wondering.. 8)
tughillbill
5+ Years
5+ Years
 
Posts: 23
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2005 6:01 pm
Location: SIDNEY,N.Y.

Postby kinelbor » Tue Nov 28, 2006 9:54 am

Brandon Webb silverta16 wrote:I never really understood octane, my Camaro SS says to run premium, I always run the 87 octane. When you get on it the valves rattle, if you run the good gas in it, it doesn't do it. Cheap gas makes you think you need to adjust the valves. Why is that? I can understand needing it for the higher compression but why do the valves rattle? :D Brandon


I believe that sound is called "knocking or pinging" this occurs when too low of an octane is used. From what I have learned Octane is just the resistance the fuel has to igniting. So when too low an octane is used, as the piston travels up the cylinder the pressure builds and the mixture ignites before the sparkplug fires. This is the sound you hear, I have heard it discribed as marbles in a can. If this is allowed to continue it can cause severe engine damage. I think I saw a piston with a hole blown through the top of it! :shock:
Nik - 1948 Farmall Cub
User avatar
kinelbor
Cub Pro
Cub Pro
 
Posts: 1132
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 1:21 pm
Location: ME, New Sweden
Zip Code: 04762

Postby George Willer » Tue Nov 28, 2006 10:28 am

Brandon Webb silverta16 wrote:I never really understood octane, my Camaro SS says to run premium, I always run the 87 octane. When you get on it the valves rattle, if you run the good gas in it, it doesn't do it. Cheap gas makes you think you need to adjust the valves. Why is that? I can understand needing it for the higher compression but why do the valves rattle? :D Brandon


Brandon,

What you hear has nothing at all to do with the valves. It's the pre-ignition hammering the beJesus out of your piston tops. It can and will destroy your engine if allowed to continue.

Those who understand octane don't waste their money paying extra for higher octane than needed in a low compression engine, nor be penny wise and pound foolish when buying gas for an engine that really needs the higher octane.
George Willer
http://gwill.net

The most affectionate creature in the world is a wet dog. Ambrose Bierce
User avatar
George Willer
Cub Pro
Cub Pro
 
Posts: 7011
Joined: Sun Feb 02, 2003 9:36 pm
Location: OHIO, Fremont
Zip Code: 43420
Circle of Safety Award
Circle of Safety: Y

Postby Brandon Webb » Tue Nov 28, 2006 11:13 am

Well I guess I'll be buying the good stuff now. :? Thanks Glad I know now. Brandon. :)
User avatar
Brandon Webb
5+ Years
5+ Years
 
Posts: 2156
Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2005 4:32 pm
Location: London, Kentucky
Zip Code: 40741
Tractors Owned: 1947 Farmall Cub #1024
1957 Farmall Cub High Crop
1975 International Cub
1977 International Cub
1978 International Cub

Postby Harold R » Tue Nov 28, 2006 12:45 pm

Depending on the year model, the Camaro SS would have had a fairly high compression motor as compared to todays engines. Yours probably needs higher octane fuel. 8)
Harold R
Team Cub Guide
Team Cub Guide
 
Posts: 3135
Joined: Thu Feb 20, 2003 4:54 pm
Location: Louisiana
Zip Code: 71058
Tractors Owned: 1948,50,53, and 56 Farmall Cubs
1969 International Cub
Circle of Safety Award
Circle of Safety: Y

Next

Return to Farmall Cub

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Arthur Dent, BIGHOSS, Don McCombs, drice, Radec Aksarben, Winfield Dave and 5 guests