Sears Corn Sheller

Wed Jun 27, 2012 11:19 pm

I have been looking for a sheller for a while. A McCormick-Deering was my first choice but I found a deal on this Sears-Roebuck model. It was electric driven but the motor is shot. Do you think, if I gear down a Cub pto, that a Cub will turn it without making it a candidate for the scrap yard?

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Re: Sears Corn Sheller

Thu Jun 28, 2012 4:30 am

2 words come to mind: slip clutch

Re: Sears Corn Sheller

Thu Jun 28, 2012 5:39 am

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Re: Sears Corn Sheller

Thu Jun 28, 2012 6:14 am

My two words are: "Jack Shaft".

Re: Sears Corn Sheller

Thu Jun 28, 2012 6:26 am

With proper gearing why not? A cub should be able to handle that sheller at idle so all you would need to do is get close and handle the rest with throttle. Vern

Re: Sears Corn Sheller

Thu Jun 28, 2012 6:48 am

That would probably be a one of a kind item there Bill.

Go for it.

Re: Sears Corn Sheller

Thu Jun 28, 2012 6:51 am

I figured that if an ice cream maker will hold up to a Cub then this should to. Is it overkill? Absolutely, but that's why we have fun with our Cubs. :D

Re: Sears Corn Sheller

Thu Jun 28, 2012 7:19 am

I think that one is the same as the one we had on the farm way back when. Bill' have someone crank it, at a pretty good clip, while you check the flywheel RPM with a hand held tach. That will give you a pretty good idea of what's needed to run it from the Cub's pto. I think most of these have some extra shaft extending beyond the flywheel so it would be simple to connect there.

Re: Sears Corn Sheller

Thu Jun 28, 2012 7:42 am

Math problem: Electric motor tag, rpms. Probably 1545. Pulley diameters on electric motor and on corn sheller. Then if any, the reduction in driving the flywheel.

Mark flywheel and drive pully on motor side. One rotation of flywheel, count revolutions on drive pully.

Do you think, if I gear down a Cub pto, that a Cub will turn it without making it a candidate for the scrap yard?
Guessing you won't need to gear the Cub down to operate the corn sheller. Considering that the electric motor is probably a 1/4 horse, you will need something to slip if there is a malfunction within the sheller.

Re: Sears Corn Sheller

Thu Jun 28, 2012 8:16 am

You guys are bringing up bad memories of the turnip grinder, when I was a kid. My father didn't need to hook it up to a Cub, he had me!

Re: Sears Corn Sheller

Thu Jun 28, 2012 10:30 pm

There is a pulley mounted behind the flywheel that that is belted to a smaller pulley below it
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The smaller pulley is on a shaft that goes through a pillow block to the other side.
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The other side shows the shaft mounted in another pillow block but no pulley.
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The shaft has a jagged cut and appears to have had a pulley mounted but cut off with along with part of the
shaft. The electric motor most probably ran that missing pulley and in turn powered the opposite side.
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Re: Sears Corn Sheller

Fri Jun 29, 2012 9:14 am

Bill,

If memory serves me correct, the "pulley" with the belt on it is a sprocket for a chain drive.

Bill

Re: Sears Corn Sheller

Fri Jun 29, 2012 10:37 am

Bill Hudson wrote:Bill,

If memory serves me correct, the "pulley" with the belt on it is a sprocket for a chain drive.

Bill

I have a McCormick-Deering sheller and that "pulley" I believe had a round leather belt that ran down to the smaller pulley. At the bottom corner there is a fan inside that blows air to clear out the chaff. I'll have to go out and look closer. Check this link for the IH sheller:

http://www.old-engine.com/keystone.htm

Re: Sears Corn Sheller

Fri Jun 29, 2012 11:04 am

Denny Clayton wrote:
Bill Hudson wrote:Check this link for the IH sheller:

http://www.old-engine.com/keystone.htm

Will mine work better if I dress like the guy in the pic or would I be okay wearing just my clown suit?
Last edited by Barnyard on Fri Jun 29, 2012 11:07 am, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Sears Corn Sheller

Fri Jun 29, 2012 11:06 am

Denny's link gives you a shaft speed of 225-250 RPM, that would work for yours too. You can see holes where the drive pulley bolted to the flywheel.
I have a older wood framed sheller that I belted to my Cub, it was way to fast at idle, and nearly shook it apart.
You need to run it at hit-and-miss engine speeds.